Beer may be a better post-workout drink than we previously thought


Study: Beer may be a better post-workout drink than we previously thought

A new study reveals some potential benefits of reducing an iced low-ABV infusion after endurance sports.

Related video above: Is ‘beer yoga’ the next big thing? Did you have an awesome workout? Did your team win (or maybe lose) their game of lacrosse? Go ahead, have a beer or two. Science is totally cool about it. A systematic review of beer consumption linked to endurance sports was published in the International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism in July. Among the results: Light beer could be a decent recovery aid after exercise, even as good as water in some ways. Research shows that a beer that is low in ABV – one at less than 4% – can be effective as a post-workout moisturizer. The review also states that adding sodium to non-alcoholic beer can improve its rehydration properties. But even scientists add the caveat that it creates a taste problem. Once you go over the 4% alcohol content or have more than one or two 12-ounce low-ABV beers, that’s where the benefits diminish, says Jaison Wynne, a doctoral student at the University. Old Dominion and co-author of the journal. You then risk problems such as higher water loss, reduced muscle gains, less than optimal training and potentially increased body fat. “Says Brad Schoenfeld, Exercise Science Advisor for Men’s Health and Associate Professor at Lehman College. It’s also tastier than water, which would make you want to rehydrate even more,” adds. Even better, though, is having beer with food or some other non-alcoholic drink, says Wynne. “When you exercise, you also lose electrolytes, not just electrolytes. water, “says Schoenfeld. Food can replace some of them. If you drink regular beer without food or other liquids and drink more than one or two, the diuretic effect of alcohol will take its toll. on it and remove even more of the fluid you tried to rehydrate with. And don’t even think about alcohol before exercise. “Says Wynne.” At this point you would be too dazed to practice. ” But after a workout, there’s another plus: beer contains polyphenols, antioxidants, and antiviral plant compounds that could boost your immune system and reduce the chances of respiratory infections that can be associated with heavy training. While most beers contain these malt and hop polyphenols, the study that looked at beer and polyphenols only focused on non-alcoholic beer. Alcohol can affect performance if you drink too much of it. “Having a six pack of beers after a workout isn’t something a nutritionist would recommend,” says Schoenfeld. In general, he’s not against an alcoholic beer every now and then as a post-workout rehydrator, but certainly not every day. Whether you opt for alcoholic or non-alcoholic beer – or water or milk or a sports drink – hydration is always the key to recovery after exercise. “If alcohol-free beer encourages people to rehydrate after a workout, then that’s a good thing,” says Schoenfeld.

Related video above: Is ‘beer yoga’ the next big thing?

Did you have a great workout? Did your team win (or maybe lose) their game of lacrosse? Go ahead, have a beer or two. Science is totally cool about it. A systematic review of beer consumption linked to endurance sports has been published in the International Journal of Sports Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism this july. Among the results: Light beer could be a decent recovery aid after exercise, even as good as water in some ways.

Research shows that a beer that is low in ABV – one at less than 4% – can be effective as a post-workout moisturizer. The review also states that adding sodium to non-alcoholic beer can improve its rehydration properties. But even scientists add the caveat that it creates a taste problem.

Once you go over the 4% alcohol content or have more than one or two 12-ounce low-ABV beers, that’s where the benefits diminish, says Jaison Wynne, a doctoral student at the University. Old Dominion and co-author of the journal. This puts you at risk for problems including higher water loss, reduced muscle gains, less than optimal training, and potentially increased body fat.

“Beer contains carbohydrates and sodium, unlike water, which could be beneficial after exercise,” says Brad Schoenfeld, Exercise Science Advisor for Men’s Health and Associate Professor at Lehman College. It’s also tastier than water, which would make you want to rehydrate even more, he adds.

Even better, however, is having beer with food or some other non-alcoholic drink, Wynne says. “When you exercise, you also lose electrolytes, not just water,” says Schoenfeld. Food can replace some of them. If you drink regular beer without food or other liquids and drink more than one or two, the diuretic effect of the alcohol will take over and remove even more of the liquid you tried to rehydrate with.

And don’t even think about alcohol before exercise. “You would have to drink a ton of alcohol to get the amount of carbohydrate needed for exercise,” says Wynne. “At this point you would be too dumbfounded to even practice. “

But after a workout, there’s another plus: beer contains polyphenols, antioxidants, and antiviral plant compounds that may boost your immune system and reduce the chances of respiratory infections that can be associated with heavy training. While most beers contain these malt and hop polyphenols, the study that looked at beer and polyphenols only focused on non-alcoholic beer.

The key to take away? Alcohol can affect performance if you drink too much of it. “Having a six pack of beers after a workout isn’t something a nutritionist would recommend,” says Schoenfeld. In general, he’s not against an alcoholic beer every now and then as a post-workout rehydrator, but certainly not every day.

Whether you opt for alcoholic or non-alcoholic beer – or water or milk or a sports drink – hydration is always the key to recovery after exercise. “If alcohol-free beer encourages people to rehydrate after a workout, then that’s a good thing,” says Schoenfeld.

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