Cartels use new tactics to reach New Hampshire drug addicts

Federal drug officials are warning that Mexican drug cartels are using new tactics that put New Hampshire residents at risk. Drug Enforcement Agency officials have said that in some cases cartels make illegal drugs look like prescription drugs. Mexico, the Sinaloa Cartel and the Next Generation Jalisco Cartel, which produce all the fentanyl and methamphetamine that ends up in the United States and all of our communities,” said John DeLena, DEA Deputy Assistant Special Agent in charge. DeLena said these cartels come from chemical supply companies in China. Using pill squeezers, the cartels traffic fentanyl into the United States in the form of counterfeit pills. The drugs are moved to major cities such as New York and Boston before being filtered through New Hampshire and throughout New England. Recently, cartels have started using bright, eye-catching colors to shape pills to appeal to younger shoppers, DeLena said. All they need are those chemicals, and they can produce that far beyond what we’ve seen in the past,” DeLena said. “They target every American they can. Relentless expansion through addiction is their business model.” New Hampshire officials continue to see large amounts of fentanyl in the state. , and there are no signs of letting up,” said Melisa Staples, director of the New Hampshire Forensic Lab. News 9 recently gained access to the state forensic laboratory. other drug we see these days,” Staples said. Last year, Staples and his team tested 4,000 drug samples for criminal cases. She said 1,800 of those samples contained fentanyl. “And so some people who buy pills on the street might take something that they had no intention of taking at all, and that might have very bad consequences,” she said. The DEA said it only takes a small amount of fentanyl, just 2 milligrams, to kill a person, enough to fit on the tip of a pencil. “Our family has been destroyed by fentanyl,” said Andrea Cahill, whose son died of a fentanyl overdose. “Fentanyl is destroying families across the country.” In April 2020, Cahill’s 19-year-old son Tyler took what he thought was a Percocet to help with pain from a recent tattoo, but it was a fake pill containing fentanyl. Tyler’s father found him dead in his bed the next day. “Rich called 911 and started CPR, and he was pronounced dead around 9:30 a.m.,” Cahill said. Tyler’s story is one that resonates in families across the country. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, last year fentanyl was the leading cause of death among Americans between the ages of 25 and 44. “Those numbers themselves are staggering, but those numbers will never change the business model of the cartels. They’ll just double because what they’re looking at is how many more Americans are behind them that they can possibly become. addicts.”

Federal drug officials are warning that Mexican drug cartels are using new tactics that put New Hampshire residents at risk.

Drug Enforcement Agency officials have said that in some cases cartels make illegal drugs look like prescription drugs.

“There are two cartels operating in Mexico, the Sinaloa Cartel and the Next Generation Jalisco Cartel, which produce all of the fentanyl and methamphetamine that ends up in the United States and all of our communities,” said John DeLena, assistant DEA assistant. special agent in charge.

DeLena said these cartels originated from chemical supply companies in China. Using pill squeezers, the cartels traffic fentanyl into the United States in the form of counterfeit pills. The drugs are smuggled into major cities such as New York and Boston before being filtered through New Hampshire and throughout New England.

Recently, cartels have started using bright, eye-catching colors to shape pills to appeal to younger shoppers, DeLena said.

“All they need are these chemicals, and they can produce it way beyond what we’ve seen in the past,” DeLena said. “They target every American they can. Relentless expansion through addiction is their business model.”

New Hampshire officials continue to see large amounts of fentanyl in the state.

“We’ve been seeing fentanyl in huge numbers since about 2015, 2016, and there’s no sign of letting up,” said Melisa Staples, director of the New Hampshire Forensic Lab.

News 9 recently gained access to the state forensic laboratory.

“Fentanyl is taking over as the leading drug in the state and far surpassing any other drug we see these days,” Staples said.

Last year, Staples and his team tested 4,000 drug samples for criminal cases. She said 1,800 of those samples contained fentanyl.

“And so some people who buy pills on the street might take something that they had no intention of taking at all, and that might have very bad consequences,” she said.

The DEA has said that it only takes a small amount of fentanyl, just 2 milligrams, to kill a person, enough to fit on the tip of a pencil.

“Our family has been destroyed by fentanyl,” said Andrea Cahill, whose son died of a fentanyl overdose. “Fentanyl is destroying families across the country.”

In April 2020, Cahill’s 19-year-old son Tyler took what he thought was a Percocet to help relieve pain from a recent tattoo, but it was a fake pill containing fentanyl. Tyler’s father found him dead in his bed the next day.

“Rich called 911 and started CPR, and he was pronounced dead around 9:30 a.m.,” Cahill said.

Tyler’s story is one that resonates with families across the country. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, last year fentanyl was the leading cause of death among Americans between the ages of 25 and 44.

“We had 107,622 Americans die from drug poisoning last year,” DeLena said. “Those numbers themselves are staggering, but those numbers will never change the business model of the cartels. They’ll just double because what they’re looking at is how many more Americans are behind them that they can possibly become. addicts.”

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