Drug addiction – NCSAPCB http://ncsapcb.org/ Thu, 24 Nov 2022 04:05:04 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://ncsapcb.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/cropped-icon-32x32.png Drug addiction – NCSAPCB http://ncsapcb.org/ 32 32 Pioneering addiction psychiatrist Mitchell Rosenthal dies at 87 https://ncsapcb.org/pioneering-addiction-psychiatrist-mitchell-rosenthal-dies-at-87/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 15:16:13 +0000 https://ncsapcb.org/pioneering-addiction-psychiatrist-mitchell-rosenthal-dies-at-87/


Dr Mitchell Rosenthal

Mitchell Rosenthal, MD, founder and longtime CEO of Phoenix House, a nonprofit substance use disorder treatment organization, died Nov. 17 at age 87.

The psychiatrist died in a Manhattan hospital of complications from pneumonia, The New York Times reports.

Rosenthal was a strong advocate for ensuring people with substance use disorders receive counseling and targeted treatment. “What I do know is that addiction is not a moral flaw,” Rosenthal wrote in an opinion piece for The hill in 2019.

Stopping the flow of drugs is necessary and harm reduction efforts such as needle exchange sites can reduce overdoses among drug users, “but the next and most crucial step is to get them into proper treatment. “, he wrote.

“Treatment marks the beginning of a healing process, whether on an outpatient basis or in short- or long-term residential care for those most at risk of overdose,” Rosenthal wrote. During treatment, “we … reorient the user towards a drug-free life and an understanding of their own emotional vulnerabilities”.

Patrick J. Kennedy, former Rhode Island Congressman, mental health advocate and recovering drug addict, tweeted that he was saddened to learn of Rosenthal’s death. He “was ahead of his time in advocating for insurance coverage for sober homes, one of the greatest unmet needs in our recovery systems,” Kennedy said.

“Mitch was more than just a pioneer in his field. His lifesaving work touched countless families,” Ann-Marie Foster, president and CEO of Phoenix Houses of NY/LI, said in a statement. “He will be missed. It is an honor to continue his work at Phoenix House,” Foster added.

As a young psychiatrist, Rosenthal established a therapeutic community at the United States Naval Hospital in Oakland, California from 1965 to 1967, working with people with alcohol or drug-related disorders.

He established Phoenix House, a residential treatment center focused on group therapy on New York’s Upper West Side in May 1967, while still Deputy Commissioner of the Addiction Services Agency of New York.

Soon after, he left the city agency and dedicated himself full-time to Phoenix House, which by the 1990s had residential treatment centers in 10 states and had also established high school academies that offered treatment for young people with substance use disorders.

In the 1980s, Rosenthal was special adviser to First Lady Nancy Reagan’s “Just Say No” anti-drug campaign, according to The New York Times. He chaired the New York State Advisory Council on Substance Abuse from 1985 to 1997. In 2010, Rosenthal was elected to the board of directors of the Partnership for a Drug-Free America.

Rosenthal left Phoenix House in 2007, as part of his succession plan. After leaving Phoenix House, Rosenthal established the Rosenthal Center for Addiction Studies, a nonprofit organization that offered information and ideas to decision makers.

Throughout his career, Rosenthal has advocated against the legalization of drugs, including marijuana, and more recently, psilocybin and other psychedelics.

Rosenthal earned her medical degree at State University of New York (SUNY) Downstate Medical Center and completed residencies in adult, child, and community psychiatry at Kings County Psychiatric Hospital and Staten Island Mental Health Society. . He received an honorary degree (Doctor of Humane Letters) from SUNY Downstate Medical Center in 2002.

He is survived by his wife, Sarah Simms, PhD, psychotherapist.

Alicia Ault is a freelance journalist based in Lutherville, Maryland, whose work has appeared in publications including JAMA, Smithsonian.com, The New York Times, and The Washington Post. You can find her on Twitter: @aliciaault.

For more information about Medscape Neurology, join us on Facebook and Twitter.

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We report on substance use in the Midwest – and we need your help | Side effects https://ncsapcb.org/we-report-on-substance-use-in-the-midwest-and-we-need-your-help-side-effects/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 15:43:00 +0000 https://ncsapcb.org/we-report-on-substance-use-in-the-midwest-and-we-need-your-help-side-effects/

To Public media about side effects, journalists work with community engagement specialists to ensure the stories we tell reflect the needs of the communities we serve.

Brittani Howell leads community engagement work for the Side Effects Team, which is based at WFYI in Indianapolis and includes reporters at KBIA in Missouri, Iowa Public Radio and WFPL in Kentucky.

Community engagement can involve attending events and asking community members about their concerns. It can also include listening sessions: in-depth conversations journalists have with members of the community about a topic that informs our journalism. These conversations allow people to express themselves honestly without feeling the pressure that what they say might be published in a story.

Brittani has hosted listening sessions on rural hospital closures, housing and eviction issuesand how people with disabilities navigate to employment. In March and April, she also held listening sessions on addictions and substance use.

Substance use is an immediate concern in communities across the country, and our reporters, who cover the Midwest and surrounding areas, want to report on the issue in a meaningful way.

Twenty-five people from 12 Midwestern organizations participated in the virtual listening sessions. Most participants worked with people with substance use disorders. They were peer recovery coaches, public health department employees and worked with incarcerated people. Many of the participants in the listening sessions were themselves in long-term recovery and started working in the field because they had lived through an addiction experience.

Seven reporters from Side Effects partner stations attended the listening sessions. Here’s what we learned:

Substance use stigma is real and harmful

Participants in the listening sessions told us that the effects of stigma are a huge problem in the fight against substance use. Stigma can prevent people from admitting they have a substance use problem or recognizing that substance use is a problem in their communities. People often feel like they have to hide that they struggle with substance use or that a loved one is in treatment or has died of a substance use disorder.

Shame is also linked to stigma. Participants told us that parents of people living with addiction, in particular, internalize shame and may blame themselves when their child struggles with their condition.

This stigma made many people we spoke to feel helpless and as if there was nothing they could do to address substance use in their families and communities.

It’s important to meet people where they are

Substance use is often treated as a moral issue rather than a public health issue, participants told us. When people think of addiction, they think of it as someone’s choice and fault rather than a disease. Listening session participants said it makes it more difficult for people struggling with substance use to begin and succeed on their recovery journey.

It is more effective to meet people where they are. This involves harm reduction efforts, such as providing resources for people to use substances safely until they are ready to quit, and not forcing people to stop using drugs altogether before you can start treatment.

Getting treatment is hard

Finding addiction treatment is a challenge in the Midwest, participants in the listening session said. Treatment is expensive, and many insurers will not cover the costs or only partially pay for the services. Inpatient treatment can take weeks, which means working parents should find long-term childcare. Transportation is another barrier – facilities are often far from rural areas.

The recovery community is resilient

Participants in the listening sessions spoke a lot about the people who helped them on their journey to recovery. They said substance use can be isolating and it’s important for people in recovery to have networks to rely on for support during difficult times.

Turning what we learned into journalism

Since conducting this first series of substantive listening sessions, Side Effects reporters have followed the topics and concerns shared by participants.

Iowa Public Radio’s Natalie Krebs reported on new data showing the pandemic’s impact on binge drinking. Alcohol consumption soared after the pandemic began: among adults under 65, more people died from alcohol-related deaths than from COVID in 2020. Session participants listeners told us that alcohol use is not as stigmatized as other substance use – but the normalization of alcohol in society can also prevent people from seeking help or acknowledging that their drinking became problematic.

WFYI’s Darian Benson reported on the solutions states like Indiana are experimenting with to reduce transport barriers. A partnership with ride-sharing service Lyft offers free rides to treatment. She also shared how expectant mothers struggling with addiction fear abuse from health care providers and worry about losing custody of their babies — and how peer recovery coaches who are trained to work as doulas can help them access prenatal care, addiction treatment, and help them advocate in medical settings.

What happens afterwards?

Side Effects Public Media will host four more virtual listening sessions on substance use, addiction and recovery. They will take place at 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. EST on Tuesday, December 6 and Thursday, December 8.

This time we are actively seeking people of color as well as people from rural areas who have had experience with addiction and recovery. We know their experiences can be very different from those of white people and urban dwellers, and we want to make sure we understand the diversity of people’s experiences in order to tell these stories more fully and with greater representation of those affected. by this publish.

We also invite people who are in a more chaotic stage of substance use – people who have not been in recovery for a long time or who are not in recovery at all.

If you have a story to share, you can respond to the listening sessions here or contact Brittani Howell via email at bhowell@wfyi.org:

Contact digital editor Lauren Bavis at lbavis@wfyi.org. Follow on Twitter: @lauren_bavis.

Side Effects Public Media is a health reporting collaboration based at WFYI in Indianapolis. We partner with NPR stations in the Midwest and surrounding areas, including KBIA in Missouri, Iowa Public Radio and WFPL in Kentucky.

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Between addiction and prison, I let my boy grow up without a dad https://ncsapcb.org/between-addiction-and-prison-i-let-my-boy-grow-up-without-a-dad/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://ncsapcb.org/between-addiction-and-prison-i-let-my-boy-grow-up-without-a-dad/

BBefore going to prison, I was a doting father despite my bitter divorce. I spent weekends with my boy, D., attending Philadelphia Eagles games and the Happy Tymes Family Fun Center in Warrington, PA. We were playing football in my garden using a net that I had set up. I was dribbling him around the cones, taking shots while I stood in goal. “Stick to the basics, son! Don’t show up until you’re good,” I would shout. Then I would deliberately miss the ball, diving as if Beckham himself had just passed me.

I lived near a small private airstrip, and we’d lay in that same yard watching rainbow-colored hot air balloons float across the sky. In the fall, when wood smoke billowed from nearby chimneys, D. begged for a campfire in the backyard pit. I wrapped him in a warm blanket and drank Guinness while he shoved a coat hanger into a squishy cube of marshmallow and roasted it to death. He would laugh at the flaming sugar dripping mess, and I would memorize every little detail of his face to have enough memories to spend another lonely week without him.

Yet I was so ashamed of being a part-time father. My own biological father remarried when I was young and started a new family, only seeing me on weekends. I felt like a ghost parent floating in and out of Gd’s life, just like those hot air balloons – totally present and loving when we were together, and uninvolved when we were apart.

bid one

Raising D. on the weekends was difficult. Trying to raise him while I sat in a tiny cell dwelling on my mistakes was nearly impossible. I first learned of this at age 29, when I was addicted to alcohol, pills, and cocaine, and was jailed for three years for theft. It started a vicious cycle of addiction and incarceration – and left my boy growing up without a father.

My first time inside, D. was 6 years old. I was able to talk to him on the phone on Saturdays when he was staying with my mother and my stepfather. We would yell at their barking dogs and laugh at their playful squabbles.

“Poppy says Grammy is running too many errands, and Grammy is yelling at Poppy for farting at the dinner table!” D. told me once. “They are so funny, dad.”

D. liked to find a corner in the house and demand privacy for “dad time” so he could tell me about his week in elementary school. Then I would teach him guitar chords over the phone, counting the positions on the fretboard and telling him where to place each of his little fingers. We had distance learning down to a science, and it felt good.

“Just keep practicing,” I told him. “You will improve every day, just like you did in football.”

“I almost forgot to tell you that I scored a goal!” he would announce.

I was proud of him, but hearing such news brought out my deepest fear: I missed my son’s life. Trying to explain my absence, I clenched my fingers around the prison phone and held back tears.

“You know I didn’t leave you on purpose, right D.?” I remember telling him once. “I love you so much.”

“I know dad. You’re just sick and Grammy says you’ll get help.

But after a while, making an effort to stay in my child’s life from inside prison walls felt futile. Visits, phone calls, letters, and emails are not the same as coaching Little League or teaching your child to write a reading report.

Bid two

D. was 11 when I returned to prison, again for theft. He was old enough to realize that I wasn’t out of town looking for help, and the rift between our affections grew. We continued to talk on the phone, but mostly during the holidays. The conversations were sad and detached. I sent him birthday cards and unanswered letters.

I was only gone 13 months, but that was enough to hurt. For years, his paternal role models had been his grandfathers, uncles and cousins. Athletes on television. Heroes of novels. Everyone, except me.

Bid three

D. was 15 when I made my third offer: a 10-year sentence for burglary. Through sporadic emails and an annual Christmas phone call, I learned that he excelled in school and was still crazy about football.

When D. graduated from high school, I should have shouted from the bleachers; instead, I got involved in a fight with my cellmate. Later that day I opened an email from my mom and saw a picture of my handsome boy in a cap and dress.

Since he didn’t want to talk on the phone anymore, I emailed him again and again. His answers were getting further and further away, and the occasional emails I received were hard for any father to read.

“You let me down, so I don’t need you anymore,” he once wrote. “Leave me alone.”

My love for my son was unconditional, but it wasn’t enough to keep me clean. It was selfish to get arrested and leave him to fend for himself, an unthinkable act of abandonment that hurt him deeply. I know because he told me.

He told me with unanswered letters and when he ignored my videograms. He told me with curses typed in emails expressing his anger at a deadbeat father who chose drugs over his son. He told me with the silence of a year that followed these e-mails.

The difficulty of serving a prison sentence pales in comparison to the existential crisis of my growing child’s disappearance. When he got a scholarship to play football in college, I told everyone I knew about it. “I taught my boy to play,” I boasted.

This year, when his junior college’s Division I team went to the NJCAA championship game and lost, he played in front of other dads. Thousands of people looked at it when I could only imagine it, looking at the photo of a young man I barely recognized.

The years had changed my child into a man. Her face, once round with crooked teeth, was now angular and beautiful with a perfect smile. Her hair went from brown to strawberry blonde as her shoulders broadened and her confidence grew. He had a new freckle on his neck. A girlfriend I had never met.

To advance

After serving seven years and three months, I will be released at the end of the year. I spend every day trying to connect with D. I know now that I didn’t leave my son because I don’t love him; on the contrary, I sometimes have the impression that I love him more than I love myself. The irony is that when I was a terrible parent, I had every chance of raising him well. But now that I’m finally focusing on my recovery and becoming a good person, my boy wants nothing to do with me.

Things can change, however. I know this because my own father and I reconciled while I was in prison. Although my father recently passed away, we spent the last years of his life doing weekly video tours which I have come to treasure.

I will reconcile with my own son one day because I am obsessed with reconnecting. If he accepts me back into his life, we can get to know each other again.

I missed his high school graduation, but I’ll be in the stands when he graduates from college. I haven’t met his first girlfriend, but I will be there for his wedding and the birth of his first child. Even though I couldn’t cheer at his college championship football game, we’ll be going to an Eagles football game next year and heckling from the stands.

When he breaks down one day and yells at me for not growing up in his life, I’ll be in his life to hear it, happier than any man in the world to get yelled at by his son. No matter how hard it gets for us, I believe we will heal the hurt and never be apart again.

Ryan M. Moser is recovering and serving time for burglary in Florida. His work has been published in dozens of literary journals and media. Ryan received an honorable mention in PEN America’s 2020 Nonfiction Essays. He is a Philadelphia native and father of two.

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Documentary aims to break down stigma and promote dialogue about Indiana’s opioid crisis https://ncsapcb.org/documentary-aims-to-break-down-stigma-and-promote-dialogue-about-indianas-opioid-crisis/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 19:44:33 +0000 https://ncsapcb.org/documentary-aims-to-break-down-stigma-and-promote-dialogue-about-indianas-opioid-crisis/

A free screening of the documentary Addict's Wake will take place at the Indiana Historical Society at 5:30 p.m.  A round table will follow the screening.  - Courtesy of Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield

A free screening of the documentary Addict’s Wake will take place at the Indiana Historical Society at 5:30 p.m. A round table will follow the screening.

Courtesy of Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield


A documentary film crew in Indiana hopes to reduce addiction stigma. The film, The drug addict’s awakeningis set in Brown County and shines a light on the opioid epidemic in Indiana.


The documentary was filmed in 2019 and 2020 and focuses on how opioid addiction affects individuals, families and communities. Producer Lisa Hall said the documentary is about hope.


“I believe this is the first step towards healing communities,” Hall said. “And it’s all over our country. It is a national pandemic of great magnitude.


Hall hopes the film will facilitate discussions about substance use and addiction.


“If we don’t tell these stories, we’re not going to be healthier,” Hall said. “Things need to be brought to light, communities need to shine a light on their pain and the struggle and battle of addiction so that the community can be healthier as a whole.”


Hall is working on a new version of the documentary for students which will be released in 2023.


“We have this interest, an outcry for this educational version, something that will really help prevent that,” Hall said.


Lissi Lobb hopes to get as many Hoosiers as possible to watch the film. Lobb is the behavioral health program director for Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield, which has hosted screenings statewide.


“Brown County is our neighbors,” Lobb said. “It’s not, you know, somewhere far, far away from us. No, we are affected by it every day.


Overdose deaths in Indiana have reached record highs. Indiana had the 13th highest number of overdose deaths in the country in 2020, according to the US Centers for Disease Control. An estimated 2,755 Hoosiers died of drug overdoses last year, which experts largely attribute to the ubiquity of the powerful synthetic opioid fentanyl.


The following free screening of The Addict’s Wake will take place at the Indiana Historical Society on Thursday, November 17, beginning at 5:30 p.m. A round table will follow the screening.


Contact journalist Darian Benson at dbenson@wfyi.org.


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Alaska Native nonprofit puts culture at the forefront of substance abuse prevention https://ncsapcb.org/alaska-native-nonprofit-puts-culture-at-the-forefront-of-substance-abuse-prevention/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 19:53:17 +0000 https://ncsapcb.org/alaska-native-nonprofit-puts-culture-at-the-forefront-of-substance-abuse-prevention/

CITC organizes berry picking outings for youth as part of its drug prevention services. (Photo courtesy of CITC)

This summer, the Cook Inlet Tribal Council took young people berry picking as part of their substance abuse prevention program.

CITC is a tribal non-profit organization that calls itself a “culturally responsive social service organization”. Dr. Angela Michaud is the Senior Director of Recovery Services at CITC.

“With our wild blueberries, we didn’t have enough to do [the jam] for the 50 people who were in the room,” Michaud said. “So we went to Costco and bought some blueberries and mixed them with the wild blueberries and made our jam that way.”

She said adapting village traditions to a city like Anchorage helps young people tap into their culture to improve their health outcomes and reduce addiction rates.

“Anchorage is a huge village,” Michaud said. “He is [about] go out and have that feeling of connection.

barries in jars
A CITC cultural event involves taking young people berry picking and then giving them a jar to take home to their families. (Photo courtesy of CITC)

Prevention through youth engagement

CITC has found through surveys that participants do not use substances when participating in cultural activities.

“It’s a five-hour period where they can say ‘I didn’t drink, use alcohol or drugs’ and they were happy,” Michaud said.

Building on these promising results, CITC is using two new federal grants to place Alaska Native cultural education at the forefront of its drug prevention programs.

“What we do is we implement a culture of healing [to] prevent smoking, alcohol, drug addiction and suicide,” said Michaud.

With some of the money, they can host monthly cultural events targeting Alaska Native youth and their family members.

Chris Delgado comes from an Inupiaq family and acts as a prevention supervisor, directing these activities for the CITC. He grew up in Anchorage.

“I missed some of the cultural activities going on,” Delgado said. “It’s going to be slowly forgotten if we don’t stop and do something about it. As long as we can involve young people, I think we are in good shape.

CITC’s prevention activities include more conventional training, such as how to use naloxone, a drug that reverses opioid overdoses. But it also offers lessons in dancing, walrus ivory carving, berry picking, traditional storytelling, ice fishing and hooligan net fishing.

a sculpted tusk
Young people participate in tusk carving cultural activities as part of the CITC program. (Photo courtesy of CITC)

These programs aim to build the confidence of Indigenous youth and teach life skills that participants can learn and share, Michaud said.

A case for connectivity

A recent article published in a leading medical journal highlighted that teens who feel more connected to their community, peers and families have up to 66% less risk of substance use.

Robert Blum of Johns Hopkins University is an expert on adolescent health and the lead author of the article. He pointed out that studies have long shown that conventional, information-based youth drug prevention strategies have no effect on young people – and sometimes even have negative effects. He advocates treating “young people as resources rather than problems”.

CITC has a program that uses young people in long-term recovery as a resource, hiring them to help teach their peers.

“They are able to share their experiences with others to help them succeed in the program,” said Michaud.

Small details, like providing food options that are part of traditional Indigenous diets, bring these communities of peers together.

“People started getting used to eating salmon, and then this year we finally got to get them out there so we could fish it,” she said. “And they took their own fish and brought it back. It’s just the excitement and the stories that came out of it.

As a result of this program, she cites a decrease in recidivism rates and an increase in the number of participants who complete the program and obtain employment and housing.

“We don’t just want to survive,” Michaud said. “We thrive [when] we brought this stuff to the table. We were overcoming our adversities, and it feels different.

A reversed model

Michaud says many prevention programs take a Western medicine curriculum and simply add Indigenous words to it. But the CITC team has built its entire course on culture. She says Western models are secondary.

“You teach them to connect with nature and bring people outdoors away from distractions, drugs, alcohol and abuse,” Michaud said.

And these events are not just one-off encounters. Many youth attendees join one event and then go on to enroll in others, even getting involved in other programs offered by CITC to boost employment and education graduation rates secondary.

A group collected seeds and planted them in a community garden. Once ripe, the food went to the Alaska Native Health Center so patients could eat traditional foods.

“And how that relates to our culture is that we’ve had so much trauma over the last two, three generations that a lot of the culture has been taken away,” Michaud said.

She says Native and Alaskan Native people have led healthy lifestyles for thousands of years, and only in the last few hundred years have they had these health issues. related to addiction.

“We were fine and then we weren’t,” she said. “And now we just go back to what we know and we’re fine.”

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Review: Anthony Bourdain’s ‘unauthorized’ biography is a cold and unpleasant read https://ncsapcb.org/review-anthony-bourdains-unauthorized-biography-is-a-cold-and-unpleasant-read/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 18:46:17 +0000 https://ncsapcb.org/review-anthony-bourdains-unauthorized-biography-is-a-cold-and-unpleasant-read/

Next June, it will be five years since the news broke that Anthony Bourdain had been found dead in a hotel room in France. He lived what at least look at like the ideal life, and then he no longer wanted it. He left no note or big sign that he was going to kill himself. This means that those of us who respected him must continue to live and feel that void when we see his face appear somewhere or hear his voice in a rerun of one of his television shows. Like so many others, I was hurt by Bourdain’s death. I talked about it with my shrink. If you feel the same as me, try extending just a teaspoon of empathy and think of his family and friends. Anyone who has lost someone to suicide knows that hole never closes; they can tell you that it is one of the worst injuries to bear.

That’s why when I saw the word “unauthorized” describe Anthony Bourdain’s new biography, Down and Out in Paradise: The Life of Anthony Bourdain by Charles Leerhsen, I first thought it was something I didn’t really intend to read. Authorized or not, when the subject of a biography is someone who committed suicide without even giving a reason or a farewell, then the book still takes on the shadow of a mystery. It’s not so much about the subject’s life as about its end, and an attempt to understand that, whether the book says so explicitly or not. “We never had this big story, this long piece that tells what happened, how the guy with the best job in the world killed himself,” Leerhsen told the New York Times on his reason for writing the book.

But I wondered why he died, and a book like Leerhsen’s appeals to that vulnerability. It’s what people in the magazine business might call a “sexy” story. The chef-turned-writer-turned-star kills himself and we search for answers. And the thing is Down and Out in Paradise: The Life of Anthony Bourdain is far from your garden variety operating trash can. Well written so there you go. As the press around the book promises, Leerhsen interviews dozens of people, including Bourdain’s ex-girlfriends and old friends who had been in his orbit at various times in his life. (He says he was also turned down by more than one, including the repairmen who helped Bourdain move to various parts of the world and the friend who found him dead, Chef Eric Ripert.)

Still, the interviews offer nothing you can’t read online about what the man was like off-camera. For the most part, the book repackages anecdotes that are already circulating the internet or told in the creepy AI-created voice of the late leader in last year’s documentary. Roadrunner: a film about Anthony Bourdain– Bourdain’s story as a teenage outcast from suburban New Jersey, or the one behind the New Yorker story that propelled him into the national spotlight.

In the opening sentences of the book, it’s hard not to detect a little hero worship: it’s about setting up Bourdain’s old trope as “the epitome of cool”, how he was “a Jersey boy in the sad smile that combined extremely high standards with the underrated art of not giving a fuck in a way that seemed to excite both genders You wanted to be him or do it, especially if you heard the gossip about his gargantuan member .

But thirty pages later, the tone shifts to analytics. There’s a coldness to the way the book talks about family issues, depression, or the darkness of addiction. When Pierre Bourdain, the father of “poor Tony”, writes Leerhsen, “had his fatal heart attack, Tony was, at thirty, still a crack addict who cracked clams at the raw bar of a West Village restaurant and felt like he had failed to make his father proud and now it was too late.

In the eyes of his unauthorized biographer, it seems, the “charmingly patinated, supernaturally curious pilgrim whom we obediently followed to Hong Kong, Brooklyn and Antarctica” must be taken down a few notches. Leerhsen defies the dead by writing on “Don’t eat before you read this”, Bourdain’s 1999 New Yorker article that launched him on the path to stardom – and the “bad boy chef as the new rockstar” trope that too many less interesting people have tried to copy. He wonders, “Was Tony really capable of producing New Yorker– quality prose? Noting that Bourdain said publishers barely touched his manuscript there, he writes, “That’s of course what all writers will tell you.” Maybe Leerhsen would tell you.

There’s also just a sleazy feeling overall. When Leerhsen describes the tricks of the trade he used to elicit information from the “about eighty-five” interviews he did for the book, he pulls back a curtain to show us how he got what he did. he wanted people:

Assuming we hadn’t already discussed his death, my last questions usually centered on that topic, which common sense suggested we tackle after we had bonded a bit. “You must have been shocked”, I would say [empathy, flattery]’but I wonder if you might have noticed any, I don’t know [modesty, faux spontaneity], a seed of self-destruction in the Tony you knew at the time that ultimately led him to take his own life. Most (including people who had lived with him) responded with some variation: “No way, he never seemed the least bit depressed.” But whenever someone gave the second most popular answer, “Well, he had a dark side,” I gently pressed him on what he meant.

The fact that Leerhsen talks about how he got people to talk about someone’s death creates a stench that’s hard to get rid of throughout the book. It’s the reading equivalent of watching someone smell their own undeodorized armpits. Leerhsen, whose other books focus on characters like controversial baseball great Ty Cobb and Old West bank robber Butch Cassidy, is a journalist by trade, and he apparently saw a chance to speak his mind. thought to be interesting and, yes, maybe a sexy story.

The book as a whole feels like a seesaw between the author’s hero worship of the subject and his bewildered gaze at the tragedy. “Who among us doesn’t prefer a little polish on our truth? Arrangement, emphasis, refinement – that’s the difference between a handcrafted memory job and an unreadable data dump,” he wrote at one point. “Only those who never put their noses near a book demand ‘just the facts’ – which, in any case, must be delivered in an order that reflects bias and affects their interpretation.” He writes about Bourdain’s literary output, but it’s really hard not to feel like he’s making an excuse for his own book, whether he knows it or not. Then, after more than 200 pages recounting Bourdain’s story – from suburban crackpot to drug-addicted cook to dying celebrity – the book comes to its central question: “Did Tony want to kill himself or not?”

There is this famous quote from Voltaire about what we owe to the living and the dead. Those who are still with us must be given respect; for the deceased, the philosopher believed that we owe them “only the truth”. This is ultimately why I approach any biography of someone who is no longer around with great skepticism. Using Bourdain’s life and work as a way to examine his suicide, reading the story of a human being descending deeper into a very dark place, I really didn’t want to go on. I didn’t want to read the lascivious details of Bourdain’s relationship with Argento that have been torn up and down by the media since his death, and I didn’t need to enter the hotel room where life of Bourdain ended. The book wanted to take me there.

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National Park Service asks visitors to stop licking poisonous toads: NPR https://ncsapcb.org/national-park-service-asks-visitors-to-stop-licking-poisonous-toads-npr/ Sun, 06 Nov 2022 17:36:51 +0000 https://ncsapcb.org/national-park-service-asks-visitors-to-stop-licking-poisonous-toads-npr/

Black and white motion sensor camera capture of the Sonoran Desert Toad looking into your soul at Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Arizona.

National Park Service


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National Park Service


Black and white motion sensor camera capture of the Sonoran Desert Toad looking into your soul at Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Arizona.

National Park Service

Go to almost any park and there are often reminders to refrain from approaching, petting or feeding wildlife. Not licking weird animals was just a given – until now.

The National Park Service has added tongue contact with the Sonoran Desert Toad among its various warnings for park visitors.

“As we say with most things you encounter in a national park, whether it’s a banana slug, an unfamiliar fungus, or a big bright-eyed toad in the middle of the night, please refrain from licking,” the agency wrote on Facebook. last week.

The toad, also known as the Colorado River toad, is about seven inches tall and has a low, low-pitched ribbit sound. But the creature is far from harmless. According to the National Park Service, Sonoran Desert toads secrete a powerful toxin that can make people sick if they touch it or have the poison in their mouths.

Despite the risks, some people have found that the toad’s toxic secretions contain a powerful hallucinogen known as 5-MeO-DMT.

In recent years, smoking the amphibian’s secretions has grown in popularity – so much so that the species is even considered endangered at least in New Mexico due to “collectors who want to use the animal for consumption. drugs,” according to the state Game Department. & Fish.

A number of public figures have reported experimenting with the toxins extracted from the toad. Boxing legend Mike Tyson talked about it, and some researchers have even started studying it for its potential therapeutic benefits. President Biden’s son Hunter Biden has written about the use of 5-MeO-DMT therapy as a form of drug treatment.

The United States Drug Enforcement Administration considers 5-MeO-DMT to be a Schedule 1 drug, which means that it is not currently accepted for medical use and has strong drug potential. abuse.

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Cartels use new tactics to reach New Hampshire drug addicts https://ncsapcb.org/cartels-use-new-tactics-to-reach-new-hampshire-drug-addicts/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 23:59:00 +0000 https://ncsapcb.org/cartels-use-new-tactics-to-reach-new-hampshire-drug-addicts/ Federal drug officials are warning that Mexican drug cartels are using new tactics that put New Hampshire residents at risk. Drug Enforcement Agency officials have said that in some cases cartels make illegal drugs look like prescription drugs. Mexico, the Sinaloa Cartel and the Next Generation Jalisco Cartel, which produce all the fentanyl and methamphetamine that ends up in the United States and all of our communities,” said John DeLena, DEA Deputy Assistant Special Agent in charge. DeLena said these cartels come from chemical supply companies in China. Using pill squeezers, the cartels traffic fentanyl into the United States in the form of counterfeit pills. The drugs are moved to major cities such as New York and Boston before being filtered through New Hampshire and throughout New England. Recently, cartels have started using bright, eye-catching colors to shape pills to appeal to younger shoppers, DeLena said. All they need are those chemicals, and they can produce that far beyond what we’ve seen in the past,” DeLena said. “They target every American they can. Relentless expansion through addiction is their business model.” New Hampshire officials continue to see large amounts of fentanyl in the state. , and there are no signs of letting up,” said Melisa Staples, director of the New Hampshire Forensic Lab. News 9 recently gained access to the state forensic laboratory. other drug we see these days,” Staples said. Last year, Staples and his team tested 4,000 drug samples for criminal cases. She said 1,800 of those samples contained fentanyl. “And so some people who buy pills on the street might take something that they had no intention of taking at all, and that might have very bad consequences,” she said. The DEA said it only takes a small amount of fentanyl, just 2 milligrams, to kill a person, enough to fit on the tip of a pencil. “Our family has been destroyed by fentanyl,” said Andrea Cahill, whose son died of a fentanyl overdose. “Fentanyl is destroying families across the country.” In April 2020, Cahill’s 19-year-old son Tyler took what he thought was a Percocet to help with pain from a recent tattoo, but it was a fake pill containing fentanyl. Tyler’s father found him dead in his bed the next day. “Rich called 911 and started CPR, and he was pronounced dead around 9:30 a.m.,” Cahill said. Tyler’s story is one that resonates in families across the country. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, last year fentanyl was the leading cause of death among Americans between the ages of 25 and 44. “Those numbers themselves are staggering, but those numbers will never change the business model of the cartels. They’ll just double because what they’re looking at is how many more Americans are behind them that they can possibly become. addicts.”

Federal drug officials are warning that Mexican drug cartels are using new tactics that put New Hampshire residents at risk.

Drug Enforcement Agency officials have said that in some cases cartels make illegal drugs look like prescription drugs.

“There are two cartels operating in Mexico, the Sinaloa Cartel and the Next Generation Jalisco Cartel, which produce all of the fentanyl and methamphetamine that ends up in the United States and all of our communities,” said John DeLena, assistant DEA assistant. special agent in charge.

DeLena said these cartels originated from chemical supply companies in China. Using pill squeezers, the cartels traffic fentanyl into the United States in the form of counterfeit pills. The drugs are smuggled into major cities such as New York and Boston before being filtered through New Hampshire and throughout New England.

Recently, cartels have started using bright, eye-catching colors to shape pills to appeal to younger shoppers, DeLena said.

“All they need are these chemicals, and they can produce it way beyond what we’ve seen in the past,” DeLena said. “They target every American they can. Relentless expansion through addiction is their business model.”

New Hampshire officials continue to see large amounts of fentanyl in the state.

“We’ve been seeing fentanyl in huge numbers since about 2015, 2016, and there’s no sign of letting up,” said Melisa Staples, director of the New Hampshire Forensic Lab.

News 9 recently gained access to the state forensic laboratory.

“Fentanyl is taking over as the leading drug in the state and far surpassing any other drug we see these days,” Staples said.

Last year, Staples and his team tested 4,000 drug samples for criminal cases. She said 1,800 of those samples contained fentanyl.

“And so some people who buy pills on the street might take something that they had no intention of taking at all, and that might have very bad consequences,” she said.

The DEA has said that it only takes a small amount of fentanyl, just 2 milligrams, to kill a person, enough to fit on the tip of a pencil.

“Our family has been destroyed by fentanyl,” said Andrea Cahill, whose son died of a fentanyl overdose. “Fentanyl is destroying families across the country.”

In April 2020, Cahill’s 19-year-old son Tyler took what he thought was a Percocet to help relieve pain from a recent tattoo, but it was a fake pill containing fentanyl. Tyler’s father found him dead in his bed the next day.

“Rich called 911 and started CPR, and he was pronounced dead around 9:30 a.m.,” Cahill said.

Tyler’s story is one that resonates with families across the country. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, last year fentanyl was the leading cause of death among Americans between the ages of 25 and 44.

“We had 107,622 Americans die from drug poisoning last year,” DeLena said. “Those numbers themselves are staggering, but those numbers will never change the business model of the cartels. They’ll just double because what they’re looking at is how many more Americans are behind them that they can possibly become. addicts.”

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Catherine Choi overcame her addiction — and it inspired her to create… – Women of Influence https://ncsapcb.org/catherine-choi-overcame-her-addiction-and-it-inspired-her-to-create-women-of-influence/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 19:06:58 +0000 https://ncsapcb.org/catherine-choi-overcame-her-addiction-and-it-inspired-her-to-create-women-of-influence/

By Sarah Kelsey

In 2011, when Catherine Choi first launched her sustainable and stylish lifestyle business, So younghis biggest goal was to see its products on the shelves of key retailers like Indigo, Whole Foods Markets and Anthropologie.

Today, not only do lunch bags, backpacks and travel cases grace the shelves of its Goal stores, they can be found in some of the world’s trendiest boutiques and are available online across international. They were also covered by teen vogue, Today, Squire, Oprah’s Magazine, and others.

“Everything snowballed in 2019 — when Anthropologie noticed, others did, too,” she says. “We didn’t realize how much attention was on the trends spotted by the retailer. It was a blessing for our company.

If you ask Catherine about her journey to success with SoYoung, she points to a time long before they made it Anthropologie, more than a decade before she founded the brand.

Having been raised in an abusive environment that led her to feel deeply anxious and unworthy in Montreal, and a series of bad choices led her to become addicted to heroin. She spent four years living with an addiction before going through medical rehab in 1997. What followed, Catherine says, was the start of her “personal healing journey”.

“I lived a lot of my life believing in my own inadequacies, that I wasn’t good enough,” she says. As part of her recovery, she began studying shiatsu massage and found that she was unfulfilled by her current career path. “I was not passionate about my role in the financial software and banking industry. My husband at the time was much more free-spirited than me and kept encouraging me to quit. But I didn’t know what I wanted to do. »

“I had lived much of my own life believing in my own shortcomings, that I wasn’t good enough.”

Fast forward a few years, and Catherine had “a moment of epiphany.”

Following the birth of her son, she began to spend a lot of time researching baby products. She looked at the bag options she had to carry all her necessities and thought, I can do better, “So that’s what I decided to do.” Catherine set her sights on creating a diaper bag, pushing through the lingering voice within her that said she “couldn’t do this.”

It took nearly three years to bring his first product to market, and although it was a flop – “People liked the bag, but it was too niche!” — the experience led Catherine to design and create a range of children’s lunch bags and backpacks made from natural and eco-friendly materials and featuring simple and elegant designs. In 2018, they expanded into the adult category with a stylish lunch box called Lunch Poche (French for “pocket”), and continued to grow the line from there.

There have been ups and downs, but it’s all part of Catherine’s journey. “I now view my very difficult struggle with addiction as a gift that allowed me to experience the power I have within, and I have no regrets about my life..”

Catherine says she received a lot of support throughout the creation of her business. Beyond family support (her husband handled all of SoYoung’s digital marketing, for example) and initial investment in product development, it was support from ecosystem partners. Canadian business, including TD Bank, Business Development Bank of Canada (BDC) and Export Development Canada (EDC), which helped propel his business forward.

“I was very lucky to have formed a strong friendship with my BDC rep,” says Catherine, “so I relied on them for just about everything.

BDC helps create and grow strong Canadian businesses through financing, advisory services and capital. But when it came time to expand her business beyond Canada’s borders, her BDC representative put her in touch with Export Development Canada (EDC). The Crown corporation helps Canadian businesses succeed on the world stage by offering business knowledge, financing solutions, equity, insurance and the connections needed to grow their business. The impact of exporting has made a huge difference to Catherine’s business

Exporting to the United States and internationally has been instrumental in brand recognition and overall business growth. »

In collaboration with her financial institution, Catherine took advantage of EDC Export Guarantee Program (EGP) to extend its line of credit. This has supported the company’s growth and allowed it to say yes to new opportunities.

Exporting to the United States and internationally has been instrumental in brand recognition and overall business growth,” says Catherine. “Growth opportunities in the United States in particular are greater, and increased volume lends itself to production cost savings as well as significant media and public relations exposure.”

Given the success of the business and the ongoing pandemic, Catherine says she is currently spending time reassessing what comes next for the organization.

“Instead of growing mindlessly, I want to assess opportunities, which takes a lot of patience and strength. I could keep striving to hit a certain number of sales, but I don’t want to do that,” notes she said. Before the pandemic, Catherine had planned to vertically deepen the SoYoung product offering by coordinating lunch containers and snack accessories, but strategically decided to branch out into other categories in order to weather the global crisis.

Along with reassessing the direction of her business, Catherine says she’s taking time to focus on her family and giving back. SoYoung actively supports organizations across Canada that help empower women and youth, and those that provide mental health supports – and in particular, a strong meditation practice – who helped her through very difficult times. The current beneficiaries are the Give to Give Foundation, Good to be good Foundation, The right challenge, Youth Initiative Trails, Yonge Street Missionand Canada helps.

Reflecting on her entrepreneurial journey, Catherine says SoYoung has helped her thrive — and not just professionally. “I don’t feel like a born entrepreneur,” she says. “It takes every ounce of belief in yourself and the resilience you have, especially if you have an idea you want to push forward. My business has helped me push myself and do things I never thought possible.

Aware of the importance of lessons to be learned from a company impacted her life, Catherine has the same hope for everyone to whom his message is directed, from employees to customers. “I hope my products will inspire and empower people. If I do that, that’s all I can ask for.

]]> Texarkana doctor found guilty of prescribing a controlled substance without a legitimate medical purpose | USAO-WDAR https://ncsapcb.org/texarkana-doctor-found-guilty-of-prescribing-a-controlled-substance-without-a-legitimate-medical-purpose-usao-wdar/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 16:31:44 +0000 https://ncsapcb.org/texarkana-doctor-found-guilty-of-prescribing-a-controlled-substance-without-a-legitimate-medical-purpose-usao-wdar/

TEXARKANA, AR – A federal jury yesterday convicted a Texarkana physician of two counts of dispensing a Schedule II controlled substance without an effective prescription and two counts of dispensing a Schedule V controlled substance without an effective prescription .

According to court documents and evidence presented at trial, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), Little Rock District Office (LRDO), tactical diversion and diversionary groups have opened an investigation into Dr. Lonnie Joseph Parker, 58, of Texarkana, Arkansas in 2018 after receiving complaints from local law enforcement about a suspected pill mill and the possible death of a patient overdose. Investigators analyzed prescription drug monitoring data attributed to Dr. Parker, and the investigation revealed that Dr. Parker was an overprescriber of controlled substances, including opioids, benzodiazepines and promethazine along with cough syrup to codeine in the Texarkana area. During the two-year period analyzed, Dr. Parker prescribed approximately 1.2 million dosage units of opioid pain relievers, including oxycodone, hydrocodone, and fentanyl, to approximately 1,508 patients (approximately 847 units doses per patient). Dr. Parker also prescribed about 16 gallons of promethazine with codeine cough syrup to about 29 patients during the same period. The prescriptions included narcotics written in combination with sedatives, creating a high risk of addiction and overdose for patients.

Parker is to be sentenced at a later date and faces a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison. He also faces a period of supervised release and financial penalties. A federal district court judge will determine any sentence after considering US sentencing guidelines and other statutory factors.

US Attorney David Clay Fowlkes made the announcement.

The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), Little Rock District Office (LRDO), Tactical Diversion and Diversion Group, Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Texarkana Police Department, and United States Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General (HHS).

Assistant United States Attorney Anne Gardner and Assistant United States Attorney Graham Jones prosecuted the case for the United States.

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