Drug addiction – NCSAPCB http://ncsapcb.org/ Tue, 25 May 2021 10:34:12 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 https://ncsapcb.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/cropped-icon-32x32.png Drug addiction – NCSAPCB http://ncsapcb.org/ 32 32 The cost of housing and stagnant wages, not drugs, are the main causes of homelessness https://ncsapcb.org/the-cost-of-housing-and-stagnant-wages-not-drugs-are-the-main-causes-of-homelessness/ https://ncsapcb.org/the-cost-of-housing-and-stagnant-wages-not-drugs-are-the-main-causes-of-homelessness/#respond Tue, 25 May 2021 08:40:53 +0000 https://ncsapcb.org/the-cost-of-housing-and-stagnant-wages-not-drugs-are-the-main-causes-of-homelessness/

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In her Voice of OC community opinion piece, 5/2/21, Lorri Galloway categorically states, “Drug abuse is the most definite cause of homelessness.” She doesn’t cite any studies to support this, and she doesn’t cite any experts on the causes of homelessness. She admits that “job loss is another cause”, but dismisses it as the main cause because “job loss is often the result of addiction”. Mental illness is mentioned, not as a cause of homelessness, but only to say that it is “often the result of long-term drug abuse”.

Apparently, in Galloway’s world, the skyrocketing cost of buying or renting housing in OC has nothing to do with the increase in the number of homeless people. In Galloway’s world, wage stagnation isn’t even mentioned in passing. Nowhere does it mention the role of domestic violence and the rejection of LGBTQ youth by their parents. This latter omission is particularly puzzling, given that she is the Executive Director of Eli Home, whose slogan is “Breaking the cycle of child abuse and domestic violence”.

In Galloway’s alternate reality, correlation implies causation. She states that currently 90% of mothers seeking refuge at Eli Home “are or have recently been drug or alcohol addicts”. She goes on to say that the incidence of homelessness and CO addiction have increased, as if this proves that the latter is causing the former. Nowhere does she recognize that addiction often follows the loss of a home.

Oddly enough, Galloway seems to contradict her own theory when she observes that homelessness is more prevalent in northern CO, while opioid addiction is more prevalent in southern CO.

All of the above notwithstanding, the most flawed and self-defeating aspect of Galloway’s worldview is the notion that more resources for addiction and mental health treatment are needed for shelters to be “really.” effective ”. Shelters are basically a dead end in OC, because we have a serious shortage of affordable housing for people looking for minimum wage jobs. We also have a serious shortage of permanent supportive housing, which includes the services (including behavioral and mental health treatments) that some people need to stay housed. Living in a shelter is bad for your health, even in the best of circumstances. During a pandemic, this can be a death sentence.

I don’t know what percentage of Eli Home clients end up in stable accommodation, or what the average length of time they are there, but no one should be subjected to living in a typical OC shelter for more than two weeks. . If accommodation is not available when someone enters a shelter, it is unlikely that it will be available when they leave. Residents of shelters are still homeless and likely will remain so.

The only truly effective approach to ending homelessness is to quickly produce housing that is accessible to all, in sufficient quantity to house everyone, including those who will lose their homes in the future. (God help us when the moratoriums on COVID-related evictions are lifted.)

I do not dispute the fact that addiction can play a role in the loss of a job or a home, or in the breakdown of a family. I support Galloway’s call for more addiction treatment programs, more drug rehab centers, and more focus on mental health issues. But rejecting the the main factors of homelessness, which are the cost of housing, stagnant wages and unemployment, and (for women) domestic violence (or in the case of men, incarceration) is blatantly irresponsible. Shelters will never solve homelessness, no matter how good their drug treatment programs are.

Thomas Fielder has been involved in homeless advocacy for over 3 years and is Director of Acquisitions for the OC People’s Homeless Task Force. He holds a master’s degree in biology and has worked in biomedical research his entire career, the last 26 years of which have been spent at UC-Irvine. He helped his wife raise 3 children in Anaheim, where they have lived for 37 years.

For another take on this problem, consider: https://voiceofoc.org/2021/05/galloway-the-silent-sufferers-of-homelessness/

The opinions expressed in community opinion pieces are the property of the authors and not of Voice of OC.

Voice of OC wants to hear different points of view and voices. If you would like to weigh in on this issue or others, please send an email to opinions@voiceofoc.org.


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Woman sues corrections for drugs to treat addiction “Albuquerque Journal https://ncsapcb.org/woman-sues-corrections-for-drugs-to-treat-addiction-albuquerque-journal/ https://ncsapcb.org/woman-sues-corrections-for-drugs-to-treat-addiction-albuquerque-journal/#respond Tue, 25 May 2021 00:06:00 +0000 https://ncsapcb.org/woman-sues-corrections-for-drugs-to-treat-addiction-albuquerque-journal/

ALBUQUERQUE, NM – A woman who uses methadone to successfully fight heroin addiction is suing the New Mexico Department of Corrections to try to make sure she can continue to receive the drugs when she is transferred in jail next month to serve his sentence.

The woman, identified in the lawsuit only as SB, said she has been addicted to opioids for the past 20 years, has several friends and family who have died of overdoses and overdosed for more than one day. dozen times. For the past two years, she has taken methadone – a drug treatment for opioid use disorder that is approved by the Food and Drug Administration to suppress food cravings and treat symptoms of opioid withdrawal.

“She is working on her recovery every day,” the lawsuit says, adding that the treatment has helped her cope with the loss of her father to COVID-19 and the trauma of being raped. “Methadone and counseling are her lifeline. She wants to continue her doctor-prescribed treatment for OUD, recover and avoid illicit opioids. She wants to break the cycle of incarceration. If she needs it, she will continue this treatment for the rest of her life.

The lawsuit was filed in federal court on April 29 against Alisha Tafoya Lucero, the secretary of the state prison department and Wensceslaus Asonganyi, the agency’s health services administrator. Lawyers for the American Civil Liberties Union of New Mexico and the law firm of Ryan J. Villa allege that the correctional service will not provide medical treatment to inmates except those who are pregnant or who are are breastfeeding.

The lawsuit calls on the correctional service to provide SB with medical treatment throughout his incarceration and the court to declare that the Ministry’s denial of drugs “amounts to willful indifference to serious medical need (and) is a violation of the law. eighth amendment ban against cruel and unusual punishment. Lawyers filed an emergency motion on Monday asking for a preliminary injunction requiring corrections to provide the drugs and evidentiary hearings on the unfinished issue.

A spokesperson for the Correctional Service did not respond to questions about why prisons do not provide medical treatment.

“Although the department will not comment on the pending litigation, we are aware of the complaint,” Eric Harrison wrote in an email. “This individual is not detained by the NMCD.”

………………………………………….. …………..

The trial compares the opioid use disorder to other chronic conditions – such as diabetes and high blood pressure – that can be controlled with medication.

In a press release, lawyer Kate Lowe said the Corrections Department’s policy of refusing the drug is “cruel, discriminatory and dangerous.”

“Opioid overdose deaths in New Mexico continue to rise, and untreated OCD (opioid use disorder) contributes to the rate of recurrence of NMCD. NMCD has a constitutional, legal and moral duty to provide adequate medical care to our client, ”said Lowe.

The lawsuit alleges that since the Corrections Department does not provide methadone to most inmates, SB’s defense attorneys have requested that she be sent to the MDC first so that she can slowly withdraw from it. methadone, rather than being forced to go cold turkey when he arrives in prison. June 9. She is already in pain from gradually reducing her dose.

“Every day my dose is decreasing, I am more and more afraid that if the NMCD does not keep me on methadone while I am there, I will not be able to control my addiction,” SB said in a press release. . “I’m afraid that the cravings are too strong, that I will relapse, that I could overdose and die.”


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Drug prevention programs step up efforts to reduce substance use and addiction ahead of teenage summer pleasures https://ncsapcb.org/drug-prevention-programs-step-up-efforts-to-reduce-substance-use-and-addiction-ahead-of-teenage-summer-pleasures/ https://ncsapcb.org/drug-prevention-programs-step-up-efforts-to-reduce-substance-use-and-addiction-ahead-of-teenage-summer-pleasures/#respond Mon, 24 May 2021 11:09:00 +0000 https://ncsapcb.org/drug-prevention-programs-step-up-efforts-to-reduce-substance-use-and-addiction-ahead-of-teenage-summer-pleasures/

SUMMIT COUNTY, Ohio – Counties in northeast Ohio are issuing warnings about spikes in drug overdose deaths, especially in Akron. The city has seen a 140% increase in the first four months of this year compared to the same period last year. In addition, preliminary data from the CDC shows that drug overdose deaths have reached an all-time high in the United States.

Like many training courses this year, drug and alcohol prevention programs in Northeast Ohio have had to pivot, while focusing on delivering important messages.

“There is so much effort going on right now in our school districts as well, really trying to focus on the general mental well-being of young people,” said Kimberly Patton, prevention and training coordinator at the board. administration of Summit County ADM. Addiction.

Patton says many of their programs are starting to return to work in person targeting teens, daycares and preschools.

“In Summit County, we start prevention as early as 18 months,” she says.

Studies show that when parents tell children about drugs and alcohol, there is a 50% chance of reducing addiction down the line. As teens look to the holidays and summer celebrations, ensuring they make informed decisions is a priority for many of these programs.

Laura Wagner, 14, who attends Revere High School, has just completed her first year with the Summit County Youth to Youth program. She says the group training showed her how to help her classmates and friends use social media to send fun and positive anti-drug messages.

“I have friends who just want a little support,” she says. “It was really fun being able to reach kids online even though we couldn’t see them in person.”

But the training also helped her cope with stress.

“I think a lot of us realize that it’s hard for a lot of people to do that. But drugs and alcohol are really harmful and we try to educate others on how they can be harmful and that it is certainly not worth it, ”she said.

For now, the group continues to host virtual camps. However, the program hopes to begin in-person training for new members in August. For more information, click on here.

Additional Resources:


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Yakima County Lawyers and Judges Say Supreme Court Decision on Drugs Is Not a Simple Case | Crime and courts https://ncsapcb.org/yakima-county-lawyers-and-judges-say-supreme-court-decision-on-drugs-is-not-a-simple-case-crime-and-courts/ https://ncsapcb.org/yakima-county-lawyers-and-judges-say-supreme-court-decision-on-drugs-is-not-a-simple-case-crime-and-courts/#respond Sun, 23 May 2021 14:00:00 +0000 https://ncsapcb.org/yakima-county-lawyers-and-judges-say-supreme-court-decision-on-drugs-is-not-a-simple-case-crime-and-courts/

In February, the Washington Supreme Court rejected the state’s drug possession law, triggering a legislative response intended to direct people to treatment.

But in Yakima County, the prosecutor, two judges and the chief public defender said it would also mean the system would likely be overwhelmed with people having their criminal records cleared and possibly reimbursed with fines and court costs incurred as a result. – sometimes in cases dating back half a century.

“In my lifetime, it was the biggest decision that affected the system at its core,” Yakima County District Attorney Joe Brusic said. “We haven’t seen anything like it. We need the cake.

Brusic believes the county will lose one of its crime-fighting tools by reducing drug possession to a misdemeanor.

However, Paul Kelley, director of the designated attorneys department, said a newly enacted law could signal that there may be other ways to tackle drug abuse than through the courts.

“It’s recognition that the criminal justice system didn’t work,” Kelley said.

In February, the Supreme Court ruled 5-4 that the 50-year-old drug possession law was unconstitutional because prosecutors did not have to prove that someone knowingly had drugs on them. In the case before the High Court, State v. Blake, a woman was convicted of felony drug possession because police found methamphetamine in the coin pocket of jeans she bought at a thrift store and did not check the pockets first.

In overturning the law, the High Court also declared the law unconstitutional from the start, meaning anyone who has ever been convicted of simple possession can have their conviction dismissed.

In response, the legislature adopted Senate Bill 5476, which makes simple drug possession a misdemeanor offense, but only after someone has gone through a diversion program twice before seeking treatment. It also requires a system to help people find treatment programs.

This misdemeanor penalty would expire at the end of 2023, with the idea that lawmakers would review its effectiveness.

“This shifts the system from responding to possession as a crime to focusing on behavioral health response, which is a much more appropriate and effective way to address the needs underlying abuse. drugs, ”Gov. Jay Inslee said when he signed the bill. law.

All three state senators representing Yakima Valley voted against, as did Representatives Bruce Chandler, R-Granger and Jeremie Dufault, R-Selah.

Kelley said the ruling would have positive effects for those convicted under the unconstitutional law. Convicted felons in Washington cannot vote or own guns.

And for those who have been convicted of other crimes, removing drug-related convictions may shorten their sentences, which are based on previous criminal convictions as well as their current crime, Kelley said. It can last anywhere from six months to a few years.

But it can also present logistical problems.

Statewide, up to 6,500 people are affected, some dating back to the 1970s, said Richard Bartheld, president of the Yakima County Superior Court. And canceling someone’s case isn’t as easy as hitting a delete button.

“The judge is a person in the script. We have the clerk who is to take the petition, the prosecutor who reviews it, a defense attorney, the judge and staff, and the Washington State Patrol, ”Bartheld said. “There are a lot of people taking care of this case.”

The state patrol maintains a criminal record.

Kelley said his office has already started prioritizing cases in which quashing the drug offense would have an immediate effect on a person’s freedoms. But he said it also meant an additional workload for his lawyers.

So far, there haven’t been too many scheduled reconsideration hearings, as many of those affected are in prison and communication is slow at this point. Kelley predicts that it will take some time to process requests as they come in.

Bartheld said the court may need to set aside time just to process those claims.

Then there is the issue of the money the person was required to pay because of the conviction, which is called a legal financial obligation.

If the conviction was overturned, Kelley and Brusic said the person should be reimbursed for what they paid.

“It’s huge, not just going forward, and retroactivity,” Brusic said.

The law requires that a fund be created by the state to reimburse people for their legal financial obligations.

Although the legislature has reinstated some criminal penalties for drug possession, Brusic does not think this is enough to deter those whose drug abuse leads them to other crimes. He thinks drugs are the ‘no’. 1 ”determining factor of crime in the valley.

As a misdemeanor, the maximum penalty for drug possession would be 90 days in jail and / or a fine of $ 1,000. But, Brusic said it was only on the third offense. For the first two offenses, the person must enroll in a diversion program, where charges are dropped if they complete drug treatment.

A misdemeanor conviction, Brusic said, may not be a threat enough to encourage someone to enter a treatment program.

“What hammer do we have to get them for treatment?” Brusic asked.

Yakima County has a drug court where people can have their criminal charges dropped if they undergo treatment.

Judge David Elofson, who presides over the drug court, said the 18-month program is one that requires focus and dedication on the part of participants. Participants in drug courts are tested for drugs several times a week, are required to attend regular meetings, and are monitored by the court and treatment facilities.

“For them, it’s an act of courage to say that they want to be pure,” Elofson said.

As a result of the Blake case, the court lost about half a dozen of its 65 participants as their charges were dropped. Other state drug courts have lost up to half of their participants, Elofson said, but Yakima County accepts participants who have been convicted of other crimes, but drug abuse has been a factor in their actions.

Bartheld said he had seen numerous cases of domestic violence in which the perpetrator was also a drug addict.

Kelley said Brusic’s stance on the issue made sense if you think the justice system’s response to drug abuse has worked. The Blake decision appears to suggest, Kelley said, that the community doesn’t think the justice system has worked and it’s time to reassess drug use as a behavioral health issue rather than a criminal act.


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Yakima County Lawyers and Judges Say Supreme Court Decision on Drugs Is Not a Simple Case | national news https://ncsapcb.org/yakima-county-lawyers-and-judges-say-supreme-court-decision-on-drugs-is-not-a-simple-case-national-news/ https://ncsapcb.org/yakima-county-lawyers-and-judges-say-supreme-court-decision-on-drugs-is-not-a-simple-case-national-news/#respond Sun, 23 May 2021 14:00:00 +0000 https://ncsapcb.org/yakima-county-lawyers-and-judges-say-supreme-court-decision-on-drugs-is-not-a-simple-case-national-news/

In February, the Washington Supreme Court rejected the state’s drug possession law, triggering a legislative response intended to direct people to treatment.

But in Yakima County, the prosecutor, two judges and the chief public defender said it would also mean the system would likely be overwhelmed with people having their criminal records cleared and possibly reimbursed with fines and court costs incurred as a result. – sometimes in cases dating back half a century.

“In my lifetime, it was the biggest decision that affected the system at its core,” Yakima County District Attorney Joe Brusic said. “We haven’t seen anything like it. We need the cake.

Brusic believes the county will lose one of its crime-fighting tools by reducing drug possession to a misdemeanor.

However, Paul Kelley, director of the designated attorneys department, said a newly enacted law could signal that there may be other ways to tackle drug abuse than through the courts.

“It’s recognition that the criminal justice system didn’t work,” Kelley said.

In February, the Supreme Court ruled 5-4 that the 50-year-old drug possession law was unconstitutional because prosecutors did not have to prove that someone knowingly had drugs on them. In the case before the High Court, State v. Blake, a woman was convicted of felony drug possession because police found methamphetamine in the coin pocket of jeans she bought at a thrift store and did not check the pockets first.

In overturning the law, the High Court also declared the law unconstitutional from the start, meaning anyone who has ever been convicted of simple possession can have their conviction dismissed.

In response, the legislature adopted Senate Bill 5476, which makes simple drug possession a misdemeanor offense, but only after someone has gone through a diversion program twice before seeking treatment. It also requires a system to help people find treatment programs.

This misdemeanor penalty would expire at the end of 2023, with the idea that lawmakers would review its effectiveness.

“This shifts the system from responding to possession as a crime to focusing on behavioral health response, which is a much more appropriate and effective way to address the needs underlying abuse. drugs, ”Gov. Jay Inslee said when he signed the bill. law.

All three state senators representing Yakima Valley voted against, as did Representatives Bruce Chandler, R-Granger and Jeremie Dufault, R-Selah.

Kelley said the ruling would have positive effects for those convicted under the unconstitutional law. Convicted felons in Washington cannot vote or own guns.

And for those who have been convicted of other crimes, removing drug-related convictions may shorten their sentences, which are based on previous criminal convictions as well as their current crime, Kelley said. It can last anywhere from six months to a few years.

But it can also present logistical problems.

Statewide, up to 6,500 people are affected, some dating back to the 1970s, said Richard Bartheld, president of the Yakima County Superior Court. And canceling someone’s case isn’t as easy as hitting a delete button.

“The judge is a person in the script. We have the clerk who is to take the petition, the prosecutor who reviews it, a defense attorney, the judge and staff, and the Washington State Patrol, ”Bartheld said. “There are a lot of people taking care of this case.”

The state patrol maintains a criminal record.

Kelley said his office has already started prioritizing cases in which quashing the drug offense would have an immediate effect on a person’s freedoms. But he said it also meant an additional workload for his lawyers.

So far, there haven’t been too many scheduled reconsideration hearings, as many of those affected are in prison and communication is slow at this point. Kelley predicts that it will take some time to process requests as they come in.

Bartheld said the court may need to set aside time just to process those claims.

Then there is the issue of the money the person was required to pay because of the conviction, which is called a legal financial obligation.

If the conviction was overturned, Kelley and Brusic said the person should be reimbursed for what they paid.

“It’s huge, not just going forward, and retroactivity,” Brusic said.

The law requires that a fund be created by the state to reimburse people for their legal financial obligations.

Although the legislature has reinstated some criminal penalties for drug possession, Brusic does not think this is enough to deter those whose drug abuse leads them to other crimes. He thinks drugs are the ‘no’. 1 ”determining factor of crime in the valley.

As a misdemeanor, the maximum penalty for drug possession would be 90 days in jail and / or a fine of $ 1,000. But, Brusic said it was only on the third offense. For the first two offenses, the person must enroll in a diversion program, where charges are dropped if they complete drug treatment.

A misdemeanor conviction, Brusic said, may not be a threat enough to encourage someone to enter a treatment program.

“What hammer do we have to get them for treatment?” Brusic asked.

Yakima County has a drug court where people can have their criminal charges dropped if they undergo treatment.

Judge David Elofson, who presides over the drug court, said the 18-month program is one that requires focus and dedication on the part of participants. Participants in drug courts are tested for drugs several times a week, are required to attend regular meetings, and are monitored by the court and treatment facilities.

“For them, it’s an act of courage to say that they want to be pure,” Elofson said.

As a result of the Blake case, the court lost about half a dozen of its 65 participants as their charges were dropped. Other state drug courts have lost up to half of their participants, Elofson said, but Yakima County accepts participants who have been convicted of other crimes, but drug abuse has been a factor in their actions.

Bartheld said he had seen numerous cases of domestic violence in which the perpetrator was also a drug addict.

Kelley said Brusic’s stance on the issue made sense if you think the justice system’s response to drug abuse has worked. The Blake decision appears to suggest, Kelley said, that the community doesn’t think the justice system has worked and it’s time to reassess drug use as a behavioral health issue rather than a criminal act.


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Breaking His Anonymity, Recovering Man Shares His Addiction Story At ‘A Night For Scott’ Fundraiser In Midlothian | Richmond Local News https://ncsapcb.org/breaking-his-anonymity-recovering-man-shares-his-addiction-story-at-a-night-for-scott-fundraiser-in-midlothian-richmond-local-news/ https://ncsapcb.org/breaking-his-anonymity-recovering-man-shares-his-addiction-story-at-a-night-for-scott-fundraiser-in-midlothian-richmond-local-news/#respond Sun, 23 May 2021 00:56:13 +0000 https://ncsapcb.org/breaking-his-anonymity-recovering-man-shares-his-addiction-story-at-a-night-for-scott-fundraiser-in-midlothian-richmond-local-news/

He placed the cafe on the roof of his car, collapsed in the parking lot and later died. He was 38 years old.

Every year since, his twin sister, Jill Cichowicz, has hosted a fundraiser called ‘A Night for Scott’, and the fourth annual event took place on Saturday at the Salisbury Country Club. Proceeds are donated to a non-profit organization created by Cichowicz, 2 End the Stigma, which benefits local charities focused on recovery.

Fatal drug overdoses have increased in Virginia during the COVID-19 pandemic. In the second quarter of 2020, 647 people died from drug overdoses, a 41% increase from a year earlier and the highest figure on record, according to the state’s health ministry. Fentanyl caused or contributed to 72% of fatal overdoses last year.

Baldwin was the last of three speakers at Saturday’s event, following Netflix star Dan Schneider and Camille Schrier, Miss America 2020. Schneider’s son Danny was murdered in 1999 in New Orleans while trying to buy crack. Dissatisfied with the detectives’ efforts, Schneider investigated her son’s death and then helped authorities investigate a pain reliever that prescribed a large number of opioids. His story was told in the 2020 docu-series “The Pharmacist”.

Schrier used her Miss America stature to try and encourage empathy for victims of drug addiction. Before becoming Miss America, she was a pharmacy student at Virginia Commonwealth University. It was there that she discovered Narcan, the drug used to save a person’s life after an overdose. She has learned that the drug is often misunderstood and that those who need it are too often judged.


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Local nonprofits fight to end drug addiction after fatal overdoses increase during pandemic https://ncsapcb.org/local-nonprofits-fight-to-end-drug-addiction-after-fatal-overdoses-increase-during-pandemic/ https://ncsapcb.org/local-nonprofits-fight-to-end-drug-addiction-after-fatal-overdoses-increase-during-pandemic/#respond Sat, 22 May 2021 14:05:10 +0000 https://ncsapcb.org/local-nonprofits-fight-to-end-drug-addiction-after-fatal-overdoses-increase-during-pandemic/

GREENVILLE, SC (WSPA) – Fatal drug overdoses in South Carolina claimed the lives of more than 1,200 people in 2020.

Local nonprofits tell 7 News that their mission to end the addition still remains important.

Several nonprofits have teamed up to host their transformative virtual breakfast, during which influential Greenville leaders raised money to donate to a local rehabilitation center called The Serenity Place on Friday morning.

The place of serenity provides substance abuse rehabilitation services to mothers of children in South Carolina.

Over breakfast, several mothers, who were former addicts, shared their stories that described their journey to recovery and the importance of seeking help before the effects of addiction reached their children enough. .

According to data presented at the meeting, the number of people who died from overdoses increased from 2019 to 2020.

“In 2019, we saw a decrease in overdose deaths – and it was 860 overdose deaths in 2019 – but when COVID happened, we actually saw an increase in overdose deaths. We have helped 1,200 families in all of the Phoenix Center programs this year. ”Logan Coleman-Socia, Community Engagement Specialist for The family effect, mentionned.

Organizers raised $ 250,000 for make a donation at The Serenity Place, a drug rehab center for mothers with children.

If you are looking to get involved, many of these nonprofits are looking for volunteers, Click here for more information.


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Opioid addiction to natural wonders https://ncsapcb.org/opioid-addiction-to-natural-wonders/ https://ncsapcb.org/opioid-addiction-to-natural-wonders/#respond Fri, 21 May 2021 23:00:34 +0000 https://ncsapcb.org/opioid-addiction-to-natural-wonders/

Transcendent realm
By Yaa Gyasi
Penguin € 12.99

Gifty is at Stanford University studying reward research by experimenting with mice. Addicted to a sugary drink, mice press a lever that gives them either the drink or an electric shock. Using optogenetics, Gifty wants to understand the mice that keep pressing the lever, shock after shock. Gifty lost his brother to an opioid addiction; now her mother has come to live with her, catatonic with depression. Can Gifty’s research help with these opposite responses to pleasure depression, where there is too much restraint, and drug addiction, where there is not enough? Gifty’s research is not limited to this question; it also questions faith, science, always tending towards some illusory meaning. A combination of detached observation and beautiful insight, in a language that is both sober and poetic, makes this a magnificent and dazzling novel. – Ruth mckee

In the garden: essays on nature and culture
Daunt Books, £ 9.99

“As long as I could name the days and months – observe their colorful and indomitable lexicon; the scintillating, painful cycle of the seasons in this growing, dying and changing world – I struggled with the month of April.

In her essay which is almost painful it’s so beautiful, Kerri Ní Dochartaigh talks about finally settling in the same place, in a cottage in the middle of Ireland just before the lockdown. Her first garden, and the “butterflies like a butterfly bird” of a long-awaited pregnancy make short diary entries, words that appease grief, that pay attention to little miracles and the profound wonder of nature. Taken from an array of essays, this collection features 14 writers, including Paul Mendez, Penelope Lively, and Nigel Slater, each opening different windows to gardening. A joy. – Ruth mckee

Large circle
Maggie Shipstead
Doubleday, £ 16.99

On the surface, Maggie Shipstead’s latest novel is the story of two women in two distinct moments, united by the most unlikely efforts, to fly and to gamble. In reading, however, it becomes clear that the interwoven tales of Marian Graves and Hadley Baxter are existential explorations of the choices we each make for living and the depths of the mysteries that reside at the heart of all of us.

Marian is a tragic pilot, a woman who not only pushes her prescribed gender role, but also her very existence to the limit. Fifty years after her demise in 1950, Hadley is the troubled actor who will play her and, in doing so, discover more about herself than she could have imagined.

In the hands of a lesser writer, Great Circle would be a spiraling epic, more style than substance. Shipstead flies dangerously close to that particular sun at times, but her lyrical language and compelling characters continually save her. – Becky long


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Twin Cities signs show children safe places to share their problems and joys https://ncsapcb.org/twin-cities-signs-show-children-safe-places-to-share-their-problems-and-joys/ https://ncsapcb.org/twin-cities-signs-show-children-safe-places-to-share-their-problems-and-joys/#respond Fri, 21 May 2021 14:41:43 +0000 https://ncsapcb.org/twin-cities-signs-show-children-safe-places-to-share-their-problems-and-joys/

UHRICHSVILLE Addiction prevention educator Diana Smith had a hands-on lesson ready for her fourth grade class. The students had to draw their hands. On the inside of each finger they wrote the name of a person they could talk to, a confident adult to whom they could confide their problems and joys.

She told them that everyone needed someone to talk to, to keep small problems from getting worse. Problems are like stones we put in bags, she said.

“The more stones you put in a bag, the heavier it is. The more feelings you put in that bag, the heavier it gets. To remove these stones, you’re going to talk about feelings,” Smith said. .

A boy had nothing to write on his fingers.

He told Smith he couldn’t talk to his mother, uncles or aunt because they were using drugs. His father beat him. He couldn’t talk to a policeman either. His parents had told him that if he did, he would be taken away.


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New outpatient care center opens for people with addiction in Elizabethtown https://ncsapcb.org/new-outpatient-care-center-opens-for-people-with-addiction-in-elizabethtown/ https://ncsapcb.org/new-outpatient-care-center-opens-for-people-with-addiction-in-elizabethtown/#respond Fri, 21 May 2021 00:54:00 +0000 https://ncsapcb.org/new-outpatient-care-center-opens-for-people-with-addiction-in-elizabethtown/

A new ambulatory care center has opened in Elizabethtown. A ribbon-cutting ceremony took place outside The Commitment House’s new ambulatory opioid treatment center and office on Thursday at 1120 Woodland Drive. Elizabethtown Mayor Jeff Gregory said. “It doesn’t affect all economic status, all races, all genders and we have these issues here in Elizabethtown.” The facility opening comes at a time. where Hardin County Emergency Services chief Bryce Shuman said county emergency services were seeing a rise in overdose calls related to the pandemic. “When COVID hit high marks, we were seeing at least one to two races a day overdoses so much more than what we were seeing before COVID and it’s increased and it’s a concern for everyone, ”Shuman said. The House of Engagement has existed since 2011 with residential and community services for people struggling with addiction. The new facility is an effort to take a healthier approach. “They are able to come to what they think is going to your primary care provider,” said office manager Stephanie Logsdon. “They feel comfortable when they come here this way, they feel like they’ve come to a normal doctor’s office, just a regular doctor’s office and that’s what we want them to feel. ” The facility will provide drug treatments as well as therapy and group sessions to help with all aspects of life. “Have primary care needs, mental health care needs, lab work, things like that during their transition to the community,” said Cassandra Baker, nurse practitioner at the facility. “It’s an outpatient clinic where they can come, get that help, but still function in their day-to-day life.” Shuman said the goal of helping in all aspects was vital in bringing down the numbers the EMS service sees. “A lot of these that we see are people who are unemployed, some of them are homeless, and need this treatment facility to basically get back on track, so that would be a benefit to all. emergency departments, “said Shuman. And being able to see patients more frequently has the potential to make a big difference in the lives of those who are on the verge of living sober lives.” Being able to have a small clinic open where they feel safe and continue that care, instead of healing themselves, we help them find tools that are truly appropriate and learn to manage them differently, ”said Baker. The property is open Monday to Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and accepts walk-in tours.

A new ambulatory care facility has opened in Elizabethtown.

A ribbon-cutting ceremony took place outside The Commitment House’s new ambulatory opioid treatment center and office on Thursday at 1120 Woodland Drive.

“They’re breaking down doors and helping families,” Elizabethtown Mayor Jeff Gregory said. “It doesn’t affect all economic status, all races, all genders and we have these issues here in Elizabethtown.”

The facility’s opening comes at a time when Hardin County Emergency Services Chief Bryce Shuman said the county EMS service was seeing an increase in overdose calls linked to the pandemic.

“When COVID was hitting high marks, we were seeing at least one to two races a day overdosing on so much more than what we were seeing before COVID and it increased and it’s a concern for everyone,” Shuman said.

The Commitment House has been in existence since 2011 with residential and community services for people struggling with addiction. The new facility is an effort to take a healthier approach.

“They can get to what they think is going to your primary care provider,” said office manager Stephanie Logsdon. “They feel comfortable when they come here, they feel like they’ve come to a normal office, just a regular doctor’s office and that’s what we want them to feel.

The facility will offer medical treatment as well as therapy and group sessions to help with all aspects of life.

“Have primary care needs, mental health care needs, lab work, things like that during their transition to the community,” said Cassandra Baker, nurse practitioner at the facility. “It’s an outpatient clinic where they can come, get that help, but still function in their day-to-day life.”

Shuman said the goal of helping in all aspects was key to bringing down the numbers the EMS department is seeing.

“A lot of these races that we are seeing are people who are unemployed, some of them are homeless, and need this treatment facility to basically get back on track, so that would be a benefit for all departments. emergency, ”Shuman said.

Baker said having these facilities and being able to see patients more frequently has the potential to make a big difference in the lives of those who are on the verge of living sober lives.

“Being able to have a small open clinic where they feel safe and continue that care, instead of self-care, we help them find tools that are truly appropriate and learn to manage them differently,” said Baker. .

The property is open Monday to Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and accepts walk-in tours.


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