Rehab – NCSAPCB http://ncsapcb.org/ Mon, 03 Jan 2022 07:31:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://ncsapcb.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/cropped-icon-32x32.png Rehab – NCSAPCB http://ncsapcb.org/ 32 32 APEX is proud to announce its new Chairman of the Board: Michael Cartwright https://ncsapcb.org/apex-is-proud-to-announce-its-new-chairman-of-the-board-michael-cartwright/ Mon, 03 Jan 2022 03:47:00 +0000 https://ncsapcb.org/apex-is-proud-to-announce-its-new-chairman-of-the-board-michael-cartwright/

APEX Recovery of San Diego is proud to announce its new Chairman of the Board: Michael Cartwright

APEX is proud to announce its new Chairman of the Board: Michael Cartwright ”

– Dr Matthieu Bruhin

SAN DIEGO, CA, UNITED STATES, January 2, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ –
APEX Recovery is a state-of-California licensed San Diego drug rehabilitation center that offers drug and alcohol treatment programs, including dual diagnosis, and is one of the few rehabilitation centers in the south of California to offer licensed care for five levels of drug treatment programs. Visit https://apex.rehab/outpatient-rehab/.

APEX Recovery is a state-of-California licensed San Diego drug rehabilitation center that offers drug and alcohol treatment programs, including dual diagnosis. It is one of the few rehabilitation centers in Southern California to offer licensed care for five levels of drug treatment programs. Guided by wisdom, integrity, value, excellence and responsibility, they act as a compass to guide their actions and choices.

At APEX, their SAN DIEGO DRUG & ALCOOL DETOX clinical detox program was developed using treatment practices that have been shown to be effective for long-term recovery. By mixing evidence-based models to individually tailor a rehabilitation program for each participant that maximizes long-term success. Their drug rehab center uses medical treatments, psychological therapies and holistic modalities to treat people who need help with alcohol detox, opioid or heroin treatment, cocaine abuse, use of methamphetamine, dependence on benzodiazepines or Xanax, and many forms of addiction to pills or prescription drugs.

Now they are growing and are proud to announce a new Chairman of the Board with Michael Cartwright, an addiction treatment pioneer, behavioral health expert and published author. Michael Cartwright’s treatment philosophy is based on 15 federally funded research studies on dual diagnosis and substance abuse. From these studies and his personal and professional experiences, he also created a 5-pronged approach which is described in his published book: Believable Hope: Five Essential Elements to Beat Any Addiction, written in collaboration with the bestselling author of the New York Times, Ken Abraham.

Michael was named by Entrepreneur Magazine as one of 50 Inspirational Entrepreneurs to Watch in 2017, appointed to the US Senate Assistance Subcommittee on Addiction and Mental Health Services from 2003 to 2004. He also became a member. Founder of the board of directors of Dual Recovery Anonymous while being a member of the National Steering Council on Co-occurring Disorders. For these reasons and many more, Cartwright’s new partnership with APEX is a huge asset to the rehabilitation center.

APEX Recovery was founded in 2013. It is licensed by the California Department of Health Care Services and accredited by the Joint Commission. This is an upscale luxury California drug rehab facility that provides drug rehab, residential and outpatient services in Mission Valley, Mount Helix, and San Diego. Their clinical team is highly skilled, experienced, dedicated and compassionate. They use individualized treatment planning and offer great holistic programming. With comfortable and beautiful rooms, private and semi-private executive rooms are available, they have created an environment that relieves the rigorous process of drug treatment. The comfort, tranquility and relaxation of clients are paramount to APEX Recovery, allowing their clients to rejuvenate themselves and respond to the demands of treatment with the utmost energy and attention.

Apex Recovery works with most major PPO plans and will check any accepted insurance coverage to see if your benefits include their services. Don’t hesitate to call one of their professional intake coordinators to help you check your insurance benefits today. For more information, visit https://apex.rehab/outpatient-rehab/ and learn more about their SAN DIEGO DRUG & ALCOOL DETOX PROGRAM.

Contact information:

Name: Matthieu Bruhin
Organization: Apex Recovery
Address: 2810 Camino del Rio S # 106 San Diego, CA 92108
Telephone: (877) 881-2689
Website: https://apex.rehab/

David clayton
APEX recovery
+1 877-719-1057
write us here
Visit us on social networks:
Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
Other


Source link

]]>
What is happening? | Announcements | wyomingnews.com https://ncsapcb.org/what-is-happening-announcements-wyomingnews-com/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://ncsapcb.org/what-is-happening-announcements-wyomingnews-com/

Hattie Lake Ice Fishing Derby: 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., Lac Hattie in Laramie. Call 307-745-5425 to register.

Walk with a doc: 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., University of Wyoming Fieldhouse. Listen to health professionals and take your legwork.

Closure of the City of Laramie offices: In respect of the New Year’s holidays. Offices will reopen on Tuesday.

Alcoholics Anonymous meets: Daily at various times in person or on Zoom. For more information, call 307-399-0590 or visit area76aawyoming.org or aa.org.

Suicide Survivor Support Group: Meet from 5:30 p.m. to 6:45 p.m. at Laramie House Hospice, 1754 Centennial Drive.

Survive and Thrive After Cancer: A free program on Mondays and Wednesdays with two hours of lessons from noon to 1 p.m. and from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Course at the hospital outpatient rehabilitation center. Visit ivinsonhospital.org/stac for more information.

Prayers and Squares Quilting Group: 9:00 am, Room 1, Hunter Hall, St. Matthews Cathedral.

Free anti-stress clinic: 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Phoenix Ballroom at Laramie Plains Civic Center.

Albany County Republican Party meets: 6 p.m., Rock Church, 402 Corhell Road.

Survive and Thrive After Cancer: A free program with two hours of lessons from noon to 1 p.m. and from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Course at the hospital outpatient rehabilitation center. Visit ivinsonhospital.org/stac for more information.

Prenatal Education at Ivinson Medical Group Women’s Health Clinic: 5:30 p.m., Summit conference room at the hospital. Learn more or register at ivinsonhospital.org/childbirth.

Caregivers of loved ones with Alzheimer’s disease / dementia: 3 pm meet for coffee, pie, understanding and fellowship at Perkins Restaurant & Bakery, 204 S. 30th St. For more information, call 307-745-6451.

Free anti-stress clinic: Noon to 1 p.m., Phoenix Ballroom at Laramie Plains Civic Center.

UW Planetarium presents “Solar System Holidays”: 7:00 p.m. A tour of the most exciting and relaxing places in the solar system, from giant ice glaciers to lava lakes and auroras.

Free anti-stress clinic: 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Phoenix Ballroom at Laramie Plains Civic Center.

Open gymnasium for juniors: 1 p.m.-4 p.m., Civic Center South Gym, 710 E. Garfield. The cost is $ 10 per month, call 307-343-6898 for more information.

The UW planetarium presents “From Earth to the Universe”: 2:00 p.m. The desire to understand the universe may well be humanity’s oldest shared intellectual experience. Yet, it is only recently that we have truly started to grasp our place in the vast cosmos.

Alcoholics Anonymous meets: Daily at various times in person or on Zoom. For more information, call 307-399-0590 or visit area76aawyoming.org or aa.org.

Suicide Survivor Support Group: Meet from 5:30 p.m. to 6:45 p.m. at Laramie House Hospice, 1754 Centennial Drive.

Survive and Thrive After Cancer: A free program with two hours of lessons from noon to 1 p.m. and from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Course at the hospital outpatient rehabilitation center. Visit ivinsonhospital.org/stac for more information.

Albany County Historic Preservation Council meets: 6 p.m. the second Monday of the month via Microsoft Teams. To participate and receive an invitation, send an email request to kcbard@charter.net.

Prayers and Squares Quilting Group: 9:00 am, Room 1, Hunter Hall, St. Matthews Cathedral.

Free anti-stress clinic: 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Phoenix Ballroom at Laramie Plains Civic Center.

UW Planetarium presents “Wyoming Skies”: 7:00 p.m. What’s going on in the skies around Wyoming: stars, constellations, planets, meteor showers and more.

Survive and Thrive After Cancer: A free program with two hours of lessons from noon to 1 p.m. and from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Course at the hospital outpatient rehabilitation center. Visit ivinsonhospital.org/stac for more information.

Prenatal Education at Ivinson Medical Group Women’s Health Clinic: 5:30 p.m., Summit conference room at the hospital. Learn more or register at ivinsonhospital.org/childbirth.

Caregivers of loved ones with Alzheimer’s disease / dementia: 3 pm meet for coffee, pie, understanding and fellowship at Perkins Restaurant & Bakery, 204 S. 30th St. For more information, call 307-745-6451.

Free anti-stress clinic: Noon to 1 p.m., Phoenix Ballroom at Laramie Plains Civic Center.

UW Planetarium presents “Indigenous Astronomies of the American West”: 7:00 p.m. Discover the featured knowledge of the West through ancient medicine wheels, petroglyphs, and oral histories of the ancients.

Free anti-stress clinic: 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Phoenix Ballroom at Laramie Plains Civic Center.

Open gymnasium for juniors: 1 p.m.-4 p.m., Civic Center South Gym, 710 E. Garfield. The cost is $ 10 per month, call 307-343-6898 for more information.

UW Planetarium presents “Mexica Archaeoastronomy”: This presentation illustrates the important role played by astronomical observation for the evolution of the pre-Hispanic cultures of central Mexico.

Walk with a doc: 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., University of Wyoming Fieldhouse. Listen to health professionals and take your legwork.

Rita Krusemark Organ Concert Series: 3 p.m., Saint-Matthieu Cathedral.

Alcoholics Anonymous meets: Daily at various times in person or on Zoom. For more information, call 307-399-0590 or visit area76aawyoming.org or aa.org.

Suicide Survivor Support Group: Meet from 5:30 p.m. to 6:45 p.m. at Laramie House Hospice, 1754 Centennial Drive.

Survive and Thrive After Cancer: A free program with two hours of lessons from noon to 1 p.m. and from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Course at the hospital outpatient rehabilitation center. Visit ivinsonhospital.org/stac for more information.

Prayers and Squares Quilting Group: 9:00 am, Room 1, Hunter Hall, St. Matthews Cathedral.

Free anti-stress clinic: 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Phoenix Ballroom at Laramie Plains Civic Center.

Survive and Thrive After Cancer: A free program with two hours of lessons from noon to 1 p.m. and from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Course at the hospital outpatient rehabilitation center. Visit ivinsonhospital.org/stac for more information.

Prenatal Education at Ivinson Medical Group Women’s Health Clinic: 5:30 p.m., Summit conference room at the hospital. Learn more or register at ivinsonhospital.org/childbirth.

Caregivers of loved ones with Alzheimer’s disease / dementia: 3 pm meet for coffee, pie, understanding and fellowship at Perkins Restaurant & Bakery, 204 S. 30th St. For more information, call 307-745-6451.

Free anti-stress clinic: Noon to 1 p.m., Phoenix Ballroom at Laramie Plains Civic Center.

Free anti-stress clinic: 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Phoenix Ballroom at Laramie Plains Civic Center.

Open gymnasium for juniors: 1 p.m.-4 p.m., Civic Center South Gym, 710 E. Garfield. The cost is $ 10 per month, call 307-343-6898 for more information.

Alcoholics Anonymous meets: Daily at various times in person or on Zoom. For more information, call 307-399-0590 or visit area76aawyoming.org or aa.org.

Suicide Survivor Support Group: Meet from 5:30 p.m. to 6:45 p.m. at Laramie House Hospice, 1754 Centennial Drive.

Survive and Thrive After Cancer: A free program with two hours of lessons from noon to 1 p.m. and from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Course at the hospital outpatient rehabilitation center. Visit ivinsonhospital.org/stac for more information.

Prayers and Squares Quilting Group: 9:00 am, Room 1, Hunter Hall, St. Matthews Cathedral.

Free anti-stress clinic: 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Phoenix Ballroom at Laramie Plains Civic Center.

Survive and Thrive After Cancer: A free program with two hours of lessons from noon to 1 p.m. and from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Course at the hospital outpatient rehabilitation center. Visit ivinsonhospital.org/stac for more information.

Caregivers of loved ones with Alzheimer’s disease / dementia: 3 pm meet for coffee, pie, understanding and fellowship at Perkins Restaurant & Bakery, 204 S. 30th St. For more information, call 307-745-6451.

Free anti-stress clinic: noon to 1 p.m., Phoenix Ballroom at Laramie Plains Civic Center.

Free anti-stress clinic: 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Phoenix Ballroom at Laramie Plains Civic Center.

Open gymnasium for juniors: 1 p.m.-4 p.m., Civic Center South Gym, 710 E. Garfield. The cost is $ 10 per month, call 307-343-6898 for more information.

Alcoholics Anonymous meets: Daily at various times in person or on Zoom. For more information, call 307-399-0590 or visit area76aawyoming.org or aa.org.

Suicide Survivor Support Group: Meet from 5:30 p.m. to 6:45 p.m. at Laramie House Hospice, 1754 Centennial Drive.

Survive and Thrive After Cancer: A free program with two hours of lessons from noon to 1 p.m. and from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Course at the hospital outpatient rehabilitation center. Visit ivinsonhospital.org/stac for more information.

Source link

]]>
The Day – Freedom First Wildlife Rehab to launch conservation project for endangered barn owls https://ncsapcb.org/the-day-freedom-first-wildlife-rehab-to-launch-conservation-project-for-endangered-barn-owls/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 22:29:39 +0000 https://ncsapcb.org/the-day-freedom-first-wildlife-rehab-to-launch-conservation-project-for-endangered-barn-owls/

Waterford – Freedom First Wildlife Rehab is a home-based non-profit organization established in 2017 by married couple Gwen and Rich Rice.

It is the only non-profit organization in the state dedicated exclusively to the rehabilitation of native owls, with the aim of putting them back in the wild, and in raising community awareness, working to educate the public about owls.

Starting in the new year, Freedom First Wildlife is looking to develop a conservation project to support the declining barn owl population in eastern Connecticut.

“Finding out that this is an endangered species is what made me want to help,” said Gwen Rice.

The state-declared endangered animals are mainly found along the coast and in the great river valleys of Connecticut. Breeding has been confirmed in coastal areas and near Middletown, but the actual number of barn owls in the state is unknown due to their elusive nature.

Rice said the project is in its early stages and they are trying to recruit landowners who have at least 25 acres of fields cleared or cultivated and have pledged to avoid the use of rodenticides for rodent control.

Barn owls hunt meadow voles, mice and shrews, as well as bats, skunks and various birds. They will also eat frogs and large insects, but only if necessary.

“We are in the process of applying for a grant to fund this project and are looking for volunteers to help build and install the nesting boxes on approved land,” Rice said. “We have received several calls for interest and are in the process of selecting properties for the optimal locations for Barn Owl habitat.”

In the early spring or summer, she hopes to muster enough volunteers to meet the goal of setting up six barn owl homes this year in eastern Connecticut.

Rice said the owls nest in cavities and will use crevices in old tree trunks, barn attics and abandoned belfries to nest, however, these sites are limited. They will actively research and use the artificial structures available.

She explained that there are many reasons barn owls are endangered in the state.

Mainly, barn owls face the lack of food sources due to the decreasing number of open fields and farms. Connecticut has seen an increase in reforestation projects, which is good for other woodland owls but has been detrimental to the barn owl. Other factors include the use of rodenticides, collisions with cars, and human disturbance of nesting sites. Barn owls are also threatened by predators such as raccoons and great horned owls.

“We have a responsibility to help create a balance with the wildlife and the Barn Owls need our help,” Rice said. “You need a team.

Anyone interested in this initiative or having questions can contact Freedom First Wildlife Rehab on their Facebook page at FreedomFirstWildlifeInc, or by calling or texting (860) 514-9591.

Source link

]]>
Interview with Amandeep Singh, founder of the National Organization for Social Empowerment (NOFSE) | AFN News https://ncsapcb.org/interview-with-amandeep-singh-founder-of-the-national-organization-for-social-empowerment-nofse-afn-news/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 05:37:30 +0000 https://ncsapcb.org/interview-with-amandeep-singh-founder-of-the-national-organization-for-social-empowerment-nofse-afn-news/
Previous story:

Mumbai, Bangalore and Hyderabad will pioneer residential real estate recovery in India in 2022: Housing.com’s IRIS index

Interview with Amandeep Singh, founder of the National Organization for Social Empowerment (NOFSE)

Posted on December 29, 2021

MUMBAI: Amandeep Singh, founder of the National Organization for Social Empowerment or National NGO, has dedicated his life to the virtuous cause of helping the oppressed and oppressed people. He then started the National Rehabilitation Center to support the needy.

Q.) How did the idea of ​​the rehabilitation center come about?

A.) I am one of those people who believe in doing something right to bring about change. Although we are the wisest species on earth, we haven’t found a way to have an inclusive society. On the other hand, despite the heritage of a caring society, India remains one of the poorest countries in the world. The reasons are enormous and to tackle this challenge, the participation of civil society is essential. Few of us think about it and only a handful of them take action.

So, after establishing the organization in 2012, which helps oppressed people, I started this project named National Rehabilitation Center in Tughlakabad, where a unique combination of care and education is provided to the needy and the oppressed. Currently, the National Rehab Center provides free education to approximately 60 children residing in the nearby slums.

Q.) How does the rehabilitation center help?

A.) We have seen that education is the best remedy for combating poverty. The National Rehab Center provides quality education to local children with best practices. The National Rehab Center works globally in two areas: health and education.

Q.) Can you explain how health and education issues are treated by the rehabilitation center?

A.) Health: The National Rehab Center has permanent physiotherapists who help people with injuries, back pain, and other issues that hinder their daily activities. The physiotherapy center uses the latest technology equipment which makes the treatment very effective. The National Rehab Center team has over 15 years of experience in the treatment and rehabilitation assistance of people with disabilities. Staff members come from a variety of backgrounds (special education, counseling, early childhood development and psychology, etc.). They are all certified (or in the process of certification) with the Rehabilitation Council of India. Additional external staff act as consultants or mentors as needed in various fields such as occupational therapy, physiotherapy, neurodevelopmental therapy, sensory integration therapy, speech therapy, etc. These consultants are available in their rehabilitation center or on call. free and quality education for disadvantaged and disabled children. Their expert teachers take individual approaches while dealing with students. This approach has enabled the National Rehab Center to educate oppressed students based on recent developments. Besides education, it also enriches students with soft skills that enable them to integrate into mainstream society. “We firmly believe that with this education, these students will soar to the skies. To create an inclusive society, we need hundreds of interventions like this. And to do this, we need your support.

Q.) How do you see the success of the Rehabilitation Center? A.) In today’s world, where thousands of children still suffer for an education or food, the National Organization for Social Empowerment is working wholeheartedly to reshape the lives of thousands of children. disadvantaged and disabled children of society. Together we can make a difference!

by sachin murdeshwar

Source link

]]>
I was addicted to heroin and had given up on myself. Then suddenly, briefly, I felt an urge to live | Medications https://ncsapcb.org/i-was-addicted-to-heroin-and-had-given-up-on-myself-then-suddenly-briefly-i-felt-an-urge-to-live-medications/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://ncsapcb.org/i-was-addicted-to-heroin-and-had-given-up-on-myself-then-suddenly-briefly-i-felt-an-urge-to-live-medications/

IIt was a Saturday night in early October 1986. My 30th birthday party, or what happened to that. Just a handful of junkies and my few remaining friends sitting on the floor of a gray, bare room in a South London apartment. I had thought it would be fun, because for once there was no shortage of heroine. Instead, I felt miserable.

I was in total despair as a rare moment of self-awareness had kicked in. It wasn’t just that I had ransacked my entire twenties, getting next to nothing of note; it was also that I saw no prospect of the future. My self-destruction was complete. I had hit rock bottom. It was a terrifying time, so there was only one thing going for it. Take more and more drugs until I lose consciousness. Happy Birthday to me.

For most drug addicts, heroin is the ultimate taboo. For me, not so much. I embraced him, actively searched for. When I first took it, at 20, it was like hooking up with an old friend. I felt warm, invulnerable. It was the barrier between me and the outside world that I had always sought. All of my feelings of low self-esteem, failure, and self-loathing were swept away. I didn’t need anyone or anything else.

Not that I intended to become a drug addict. Like every other junkie I met, I thought I could beat the system. I would be the one able to control my consumption; the slap wouldn’t control me, thank you very much.

The first few years, I almost got out of it. I set strict limits for myself, like taking heroin only on Saturdays. But everything has become blurry. Saturdays turned into Sundays. No harm done. Then I didn’t see why I shouldn’t start on Friday. Then Mondays. To take advantage on weekends. Before long, I was taking it every day. Then, one morning, after a day in which I couldn’t take medication, I woke up to find that I was sweating, having severe cramps, and needing to vomit. It took me a while to figure out that I had a habit.

The next eight years were years of not-so-steady decline, years in which I did all the things I had sworn never to do. Injecting heroin was only for real drug addicts, so I never would. Except that I did. All the misery, scams and lousy betrayals associated with drug addiction have become a part of my daily life. Lying and cheating have become second nature. I had a number of crappy jobs, but I never got to keep them because being a junkie was a full time business. I’ve lost count of the hours I spent hanging around in cars, pubs and street corners, waiting for dealerships to arrive. There were no cell phones; back then you had to work for your habit.

I have tried to give up countless times, either slowly reducing my daily use or taking a course of methadone, but nothing worked. I did not know of any drug addict who managed to cleanse himself. But with each failure, my self-esteem diminished and my sense of futility grew. Above all, it was the feeling of shame at what I had become. It’s always the shame that wins you over at the end. Almost everyone had abandoned me. I had given up on myself.

My lowest lasted almost six months. The feelings of hopelessness that overwhelmed me on my 30th birthday kept getting worse. I wanted to give up, but I didn’t know how. So more and more I sought self-annihilation. My use just got worse and worse. I flew away, only to come back lying on the ground much later. Overdosing became a way of life – the only way I could cure my self-hatred.

Then came a moment of clarity. Or a miracle. Call it what you want. I was challenged to quit by my wife – whom I married in 1985 and who had supported me despite everything – and one of my last friends. And rather than just push them away and say I would do yet another methadone treatment that I knew wouldn’t work, I agreed to do whatever they suggested. My desire to live was, briefly, stronger than my desire to die. A few days later, they returned with the name of a rehabilitation center. I had hardly heard of such a thing, let alone known someone who had been to one. Within a week, I had been admitted.

I don’t remember much from my four week stint in rehab other than they made me lose my mind – I was sick like a dog and barely slept the first two weeks – and that I was amazed to learn that I would have to stop taking all drugs, including alcohol. There were supposed to be therapy groups as well, but by far the most important thing the rehabilitation gave me was an introduction to the 12-step program.

I will never forget my first Narcotics Anonymous (UKNA) meeting. I sat in the back, shaking with fear and completely silent. What I heard changed my life. There were addicts with months and years of abstinence – something that seemed impossible – whose stories were similar to mine and who spoke of feelings that I could relate to. I never knew such people existed or that recovery was possible. It was like coming home.

The meetings became a lifeline for me when I got out of rehab and I felt ridiculously proud when I was chosen to be the host, offering tea and coffee. Again, I was the only person to volunteer. The meeting secretary later told me that his heart sank when I raised my hand, as he was sure I would only last a few weeks before relapsing and disappearing without a trace.

But I kept coming back, made lasting friendships, and slowly rebuilt something that felt like normal life. Finding work has proven to be problematic: who would want someone with an unexplained 10-year gap in their CV? Yet after a few years of part-time employment, I was inspired by a friend whom I admired at UKNA to write. I sent something to the Independent on Sunday and they accepted it. Mainly, I think, because they thought I was the novelist Jim Crace. No matter; I had a chance. Soon I was writing regularly for national championships and had been offered a book to write about cricket.

It took a long time for relationships to mend, for old friends and family to trust that my recovery was not another flash in the pan. But little by little, after a lot of therapy – I’m still with the same therapist 30 years later – things took shape. After five years, my wife and I even felt secure enough to start a family, that we had the resources to be decent parents. Our kids are now 29 and 26 and are much more articulate and emotionally accomplished than I was after many years of quitting drugs. I couldn’t be more proud of them.

Even so, the recovery was not easy. Many of my friends and acquaintances have passed away. AIDS, hepatitis C, suicide and overdose after relapse were many. The incidence of cancer and heart disease also appears to be much higher among recovering addicts than among friends who haven’t spent years abusing their bodies. No one comes out unscathed.

My mental health is plagued by depression and anxiety and I am often on the losing side. There were many days when I could barely get out of bed because I was having a panic attack, when nightmares happen almost every night. I regularly have dreams in which I return to drugs. On two occasions things got so bad that I had to be admitted to a mental hospital – most recently this summer. Even on good days, low self-esteem and low self-confidence are still present. The desire to disconnect, to disappear, can be overwhelming.

I have no doubt that if I had continued to take the amounts I had used in the last year of my active addiction, I would have died within six months. Just another junkie stat. Mourned by some and long forgotten by all. Yet here I am, almost 35 years later, still buggering me, my life much fuller, richer and longer than I could ever have imagined inside of me. I couldn’t have done it without the love and support of so many people. To all of you, I have a debt of gratitude that I will never be able to repay.

A Farewell to Calm by John Crace (Guardian Faber, £ 9.99) is out now. To support the Guardian and the Observer, order your copy at guardbookshop.com. Delivery charges may apply

In the UK and Ireland, The Samaritans can be contacted on 116 123 or by email jo@samaritans.org Where jo@samaritans.ie. The Mind Mental Health Charity can be contacted on 0300 123 3393 or by visiting esprit.org.uk. In the United States, the National lifeline for suicide prevention is at 1-800-273-8255. In Australia, the crisis assistance service Safety rope is 13 11 14. Other international helplines can be found at befrienders.org

Source link

]]>
Apartments ready to sell like hot cakes at REHAB https://ncsapcb.org/apartments-ready-to-sell-like-hot-cakes-at-rehab/ Sat, 25 Dec 2021 15:20:43 +0000 https://ncsapcb.org/apartments-ready-to-sell-like-hot-cakes-at-rehab/

Sales of ready-made apartments skyrocketed during the ongoing REHAB 2021 fair, with banks and financial institutions offering long-term loans on easier terms.

A third of buyers of ready-made apartments are government employees, who get loans at an interest rate of 5%. The government’s political support of providing low-interest loans to civil servants and teachers has been a boon to apartment sales, an industry insider said.

The Restate and Housing Association of Bangladesh (REHAB) holds its annual fair at the Bangabandhu International Conference Center (BICC) in the capital. The fair started on Thursday (December 23) and will end on Monday (December 27).

The number of visitors was particularly high over the weekend, leading real estate companies to see an increase in bookings for apartments, land and commercial space.

Some 112 real estate companies, 14 banks and financial institutions and 18 construction companies are participating in the show this year.

Sheltech, a well-known real estate company, is showcasing hundreds of apartments from over 20 ongoing projects for sale at the fair. The projects are located in the capital’s Malibagh, Banani, Uttara, Mirpur, Badda, West Dhanmondi and Maghbazar, and range from 981 to 3,200 square feet (sft). The price per sft is between Tk7000 – 18000.

AKM Rafiul Islam, Senior Deputy General Manager of Sheltech, said: “We hope there will be a good response. We already have a few reservation orders for commercial spaces.

Another real estate company, Credence, is presenting 170 apartments for sale in 33 projects at the Salon du logement. Their apartments in areas such as Dhanmondi, Lalmatia, Uttara, Siddheswari, Ring Road and Manipuri Para vary in size from 1,000 to 3,000 square feet. Prices start at 9,000 Tk per foot.

Mirza Rommel Farooqi, director of Credence, said clients are visiting the salon to learn more and plan to buy an apartment.

He said purchase orders actually increase after the fair closes, as many customers contact the fair later.

Farooqi is optimistic about getting a big response at the fair.

Source link

]]>
Whanganui’s Export Charlotte Stent Beats Incredibly Painful Surgery and Rehab to Join CD https://ncsapcb.org/whanganuis-export-charlotte-stent-beats-incredibly-painful-surgery-and-rehab-to-join-cd/ Thu, 23 Dec 2021 16:00:00 +0000 https://ncsapcb.org/whanganuis-export-charlotte-stent-beats-incredibly-painful-surgery-and-rehab-to-join-cd/ Left arm Charlotte Stent in action as Whanganui’s only player on the Horowhenua Kapiti combined squad during last season’s Under-18 Cricket Express tournament at Victoria Park. Photo / Lewis Gardner

Whanganui export Charlotte Stent’s comeback is complete with a selection to the Central Districts Under-19 squad for nationals.

The fast left-handed pitcher Stent has joined the Central Districts squad with his inclusion in the Under-19 squad to play the NZC National Tournament in Lincoln next month.

The talented all-rounder Whanganui is currently affiliated with Taranaki as she is based at New Plymouth Girls’ High, representing the 1st XI and representing the Under-18s.

Her return to the central districts level after being an Under-15 star is all the more impressive given that at the start of last season Stent could barely walk as she faced incredibly operation and rehabilitation. painful calves and shins.

Cricket prodigy, joining Central Districts U15 when she was just 11-12 years old, Stent played for the boys’ cricket Wanganui representative teams as well as senior women in 2019-20 – the same season she was a key player of the U15 CD sweeping the annual Whanganui Cricket Festival tournament.

After being trained locally by Steve Meredith and then Dilan Raj, Stent transferred to NPGHS to seek more opportunities in women’s football.

However, with the summer of 2020-21 approaching, Stent’s father Gary said his daughter experienced a growth spurt which, coupled with heavy training on her developing body, resulted in overgrowth. of his calf muscles.

It was compartment syndrome – creating painful pressure that restricts blood flow while limiting the amount of fascia in the calves – the thin envelope of connective tissue that surrounds and holds organs, blood vessels, bones, and so on. nerve fibers and muscles.

“It looks like a spider web in your body,” said Gary Stent, a nurse by profession.

When the fascia dries out and tightens around muscles, it limits mobility and causes painful knots, while Stent also developed shin splints – literally in agony as she tried to play with the pain.

“Her injury got worse and she didn’t play much after that. In January, it was impossible to finish the games.”

A specialist who tested Stent’s calves found they swelled 33cm to 38cm after just one bike ride.

His father said that only 30 percent of athletes who need surgery for this problem are back to the same level as before.

Stent went under the knife in February to repair both calves, while having the shin bones removed from the splints.

After a lengthy rehab, Stent returned cautiously to the pitch this summer, wearing special sleeves on his legs while finishing the games with ice and salt baths.

She increased her low-impact training, doing more swimming, cycling, and physical therapy rather than jogging.

It worked when Stent returned to both Taranaki’s Under-18 and Senior Women’s teams, while also attending specialty camps for the Under-19 CD group.

She really impressed during the second edition of the Central Super League, which was held at Levin’s Donnelly Park last month.

The tournament featured four teams, which mixed established CD Hinds players with promising cricketers.

Stent was one of the youngest entrants, playing for the Levin Coastal Challengers under the guidance of White Fern Hannah Rowe, and bowling extremely well – tying the likes of another White Fern to Lauren Down.

Having worked at a sporting goods store in New Plymouth at the end of the school year, Stent will be home for Christmas before leaving with his CD U19 teammates for the NZC National Tournament Jan.6-12 in Canterbury.

“She’s absolutely thrilled,” said Gary Stent.

“She’s still a Whanganui girl – her parents live here and she comes back during the holidays.”

The Central Districts Under-19 Women’s Team is:

Ocean Bartlett (Wairarapa), Ashtuti Kumar (Manawatū), Jessie Hollard (Taranaki), Emma McLeod (Wairarapa), Olivia Clark (Wairarapa), Flora Devonshire (Hawke’s Bay), Aniela Apperley (Hawke’s Bay), Grace Foreman (Taranaki), Charlotte Stent (Taranaki), Macy Lyford (Wairarapa), Elizabeth Cohr (Wairarapa), Sam Mackinder (Manawatū), Abby Treder (Manawatū).

Coach: Dan Harper; Manager / Assistant Coach: Kerry Tomlinson.

Source link

]]>
Armie Hammer nearly pulled out of Death on the Nile trailer after actor finished rehab over rape and cannibal sex allegations https://ncsapcb.org/armie-hammer-nearly-pulled-out-of-death-on-the-nile-trailer-after-actor-finished-rehab-over-rape-and-cannibal-sex-allegations/ Tue, 21 Dec 2021 20:32:00 +0000 https://ncsapcb.org/armie-hammer-nearly-pulled-out-of-death-on-the-nile-trailer-after-actor-finished-rehab-over-rape-and-cannibal-sex-allegations/

ARMIE Hammer is barely seen in the new Death on the Nile trailer after finishing rehab following allegations of rape and cannibalistic sex.

The 35-year-old has lost numerous Hollywood projects over the various accusations. However, it looks like Disney and the 20th Century kept him on board for this movie.

5

Armie Hammer almost got cut from new Death on the Nile trailerCredit: 20th Century Fox
The actor recently finished rehab after nine months of treatment following allegations of rape and cannibalistic sex

5

The actor recently finished rehab after nine months of treatment following allegations of rape and cannibalistic sexCredit: Getty

The trailer for the new mystery thriller movie directed by Kenneth Branagh was released today and features many familiar faces, including Armie’s, although he’s barely seen in the preview.

While the trailer shows plenty of stars like Gal Gadot, Tom Bateman, Russell Brand, Rose Leslie, and others, it’s been edited in a way that keeps the Call Me Now star out of sight.

Armie is barely seen at the start of the trailer as he spins the character of Gal, and then he’s perfectly hidden by the Wonder Woman star’s head in another clip.

A few side views of Armie are seen in the preview, but never enough to fully realize that he is the controversial actor.

Fans were quick to take notice of the marketing tactic as they took to Twitter to respond.

One person said: “The way they absolutely don’t want you to know Armie Hammer is in this movie.”

Another added: “I’ve never seen a trailer with so many clippings. I don’t think a single post is longer than two seconds.”

As one of them rang: “My heart goes out to the publisher who got the edict to play them down here …”

ARMY COMPLETES REHABILITATION

Earlier in December, Armie completed rehab after nine months of treatment following shocking accusations of rape and cannibalistic sexual desires.

A source exclusively told The Sun at the time: “Armie was released from the treatment facility where he spent almost 9 months.

“He is doing very well and this is great news for his family. He is back in the Cayman Islands.”

SHOCKING ALLEGATIONS

For many months, the star has been plagued with accusations of abuse from a number of ex-girlfriends and disturbing posts, which have leaked on social media.

One message showed that he claimed to be “a 100% cannibal” and said to a woman: “I want to eat you”.

Armie was investigated by Los Angeles Police after a former lover, identified only as Effie, who claimed to have assaulted her “mentally, emotionally and sexually” during their four-year relationship .

In 2017, Effie alleged that she was violently raped when Armie hit her head against a wall.

She also alleged that he whipped her feet with a riding crop, which would hurt her for days.

The Sun understands that Effie has yet to file a civil complaint in connection with the ongoing police investigation.

Armie’s attorney issued a statement following the allegations: “These claims about Mr. Hammer are patently false. All interactions with this person, or with any of his partners, were completely consensual in this regard. meaning that they have been fully discussed, agreed upon and mutually participatory. “

NO MORE CHAOS

A number of other exes, including Courtney Vucekovich and Paige Lorenze, quickly made similar claims, which led to Armie being ditched by his art agency, and he pulled out of a number of film projects. future.

Armie and his wife, Elizabeth Chambers, announced in July 2020 that they were divorcing after 10 years of marriage.

The exes share two children: daughter Harper, seven, and son Ford, four.

Armie would now have the support of his family and his new girlfriend, dental hygienist Lisa Perejma.

Preview has been changed so that Armie barely appears

5

Preview has been changed so that Armie barely appearsCredit: 20th Century Fox
Earlier this year, the Hollywood star was accused of abuse by a number of ex-girlfriends

5

Earlier this year, the Hollywood star was accused of abuse by a number of ex-girlfriendsCredit: Instagram
In 2020, Armie and his wife, Elizabeth Chambers, separated after 10 years of marriage

5

In 2020, Armie and his wife, Elizabeth Chambers, separated after 10 years of marriageCredit: AP: Associated press
Source link

]]>
PRRD wants more funds from Budget 22 used for Odette’s rehabilitation https://ncsapcb.org/prrd-wants-more-funds-from-budget-22-used-for-odettes-rehabilitation/ Mon, 20 Dec 2021 08:22:00 +0000 https://ncsapcb.org/prrd-wants-more-funds-from-budget-22-used-for-odettes-rehabilitation/

REHABILITATION FUND. Photo of areas hit by Typhoon Odette which were visited by President Rodrigo Roa Duterte in the cities of Cebu and Bohol on December 19, 2021. Malacañang said on Monday December 20 that Duterte wanted “more funds” from the proposed national budget for 2022 used for response and recovery efforts in areas affected by Odette. (presidential photo)

MANILA – President Rodrigo Duterte wants “more funds” from the proposed national budget for 2022 to be used for response and recovery efforts in areas affected by Typhoon Odette, Malacañang said Monday.

Acting presidential spokesman, Cabinet Secretary Karlo Nograles, said Duterte made the statement during his visit to typhoon-affected areas in Cebu and Bohol on Sunday.

“President Duterte stressed that if the effects of the typhoon are devastating even as the country continues its battle against Covid-19, the government must help because people need help. He then pledged that the national government would urgently provide for the typhoon-affected areas and their inhabitants, including rice and water, building materials for the reconstruction of damaged houses and a housing assistance, top priority being given to the poor, ”Nograles said in a statement.

“The president also indicated that with the new budget for 2022, more funds can be used for response and recovery efforts,” he added.

Nograles said Duterte first visited Argao Municipality in Cebu, where he tasked Department of Human Settlements and Urban Development secretary Eduardo del Rosario to provide housing assistance to residents. whose places of residence were damaged by the typhoon.

Duterte also called on Department of Energy (DOE) secretary Alfonso Cusi to call on the private sector to help and encourage the opening and operation of gas stations, he added.

The DOE is working in duplicate to restore energy to Cebu. Currently, electricity has been restored to parts of Cebu for utilities such as hospitals, among others.

The Agriculture Ministry, for its part, has allocated PHP 445.1-M to help farmers and fishermen in the area who have suffered badly from the damage caused by Typhoon Odette, Nograles said.

Duterte also traveled to Bohol province where he interacted with local government officials and evacuees.

He reiterated that a large portion of the National Council for Disaster Risk Reduction and Management fund was used for the government’s response to Covid-19, including quarantine spending for the return of Filipino workers to the country. foreigner.

Meanwhile, Nograles urged the public to join efforts to help communities devastated by the typhoon.

“As we continue to fully assess the damage Typhoon Odette caused to the livelihoods and property of our people and to the local economy, let us stand united in the midst of adversity to help each other and exemplify the bayanihan spirit. Filipino, ”he said. (ANP)

Source link

]]>
Judicial rally: man gets rehab order after harassment https://ncsapcb.org/judicial-rally-man-gets-rehab-order-after-harassment/ Sat, 18 Dec 2021 05:00:00 +0000 https://ncsapcb.org/judicial-rally-man-gets-rehab-order-after-harassment/ An Andover man has been asked to rehabilitate after admitting to harassing a woman in Andover.

Lee Steven John Alexander Asseter, of Dene Court, pleaded guilty to following a course of action which amounted to harassment of the woman between October and November last year.

He had previously denied the accusation.

The 35-year-old was sentenced by Basingstoke Magistrates’ Court last week, where he was ordered to participate in the 20-day relationship building program as part of a two-year community ordinance .

He must also complete 25 days of rehabilitation activities when ordering, and 200 hours of unpaid work over the next twelve months.

An injunction has been granted, while he must pay costs of £ 150 and a victim fine surcharge of £ 95.

The trial of an Andover man accused of harassment has been postponed.

Daniel Christopher George Hewlett, of May Tree Road, was charged with harassing the woman by making unwanted calls and messages and leaving voicemail messages, between October 15 and November 16, 2020. He has also been charged with four counts of non-violation order put in place by a family court by message, appeal and posting on Instagram.

The 37-year-old has pleaded not guilty to all counts.

He was due to be tried in April, but it was delayed for a month.

Hewlett will now appear in Basingstoke Magistrates’ Court on May 23, 2022. He has been released on bail.

A man from Ludgershall is accused of failing to renew his sex offender registry.

Michael Ford, of Andover Road, reportedly failed to renew his annual registration on December 4 without reasonable excuse.

His case has been forwarded to Salisbury Crown Court, where he will appear on January 14.

He was released on unconditional bail.

The 52-year-old has not pleaded guilty, court documents show.

A man accused of causing more than £ 350 damage to an Audi A3 has been put on trial.

Jason David Naylor was charged with damaging the 2007 license plate car on April 6 in Tidworth. Naylor, from Station Road in Tidworth, is said to have caused damage worth £ 363.60 to the roof of the car.

The 48-year-old had denied the charge and was due to stand trial in Salisbury Magistrates’ Court on Thursday, as The Advertiser went to press.

Source link

]]>